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4 “Almosts” in 60 seconds on the Dundas Bike Lanes

 

On Monday I recorded a ride along the Dundas Bike Lanes from Leslieville to Lockwood Av near Woodbine, with my Samsung ES25 Digital Camera.

Didn’t think much of it while it was happening – I messengered for three years – this stuff happens all the time in the core … but in Leslieville, and in the Beaches, this stuff happens at a far lower frequency …

But not today.

Here it is, edited from a 9 minute ride down to 60 consecutive seconds of Cyclist’s Hell.

 

On another Video Bicycle Ride that I posted today, I sum up this ride,

“..and look’n back on it – there was no indication then – but look’n back on it, I was going too fast. And I didn’t pick up on that cue until after the 5th incident. That’s how you get killed. “

 

Live and learn. :)

I should note – that these video’s are about educating cyclists through the benefit of my virtual experiences – but they are also for other road users, so they have the benefit of seeing the experience of a cyclist, from the cyclist’s point of view.

 

Incident 1

So for example, in incident 1 – as a automobile driver, when you poke the nose of your car out into the bike lane, AND, don’t ever come to a complete stop – you force the cyclist to make a choice.  In incident 1 I never saw the driver come to a stop, so I had to choose: change lanes or stop. If a car was coming up on my left I’d be down to one choice, stop.

I might have been able to to that before hitting the ‘creeping noser’. If not, we would have then had a pleasant conversation about replacing my bike; and you later, with your insurance agent about replacing your front left quarter panel, and increasing your insurance rate.

 

Incident 2

This is the case of the pedestrian who walks out onto the Crosswalk, lights flashing – but the view of the Crosswalk is partially obstructed by a car parked too close to the Crosswalk.

In this case the Pedestrian is acting in a completely correct manner. I should have seen the lights and slowed. I did not so that set up the following: neither I or the car in front of me sees the flashing lights; I don’t get the benefit of seeing the car in front brake (because he goes straight through at speed) and, I don’t see the pedestrian until it to late for braking. So I look behind to my lsft and change lanes immediately. If a car was coming on my left my ‘bail out’ was towards the curb – behind the pedestrian – (hopefully there are no other pedestrians there).

 

Incident 3

In incident 3, making a three point turn on a major thoroughfare, just past a busy intersection with the light green on the street your using – that is a dangerous move and an inconvenience for all road users.

To the mini-van driver just past Coxwell who made the 3-point turn – thanks for stopping on the right side after your turn – and I noticed (while I was editing the video), you also signaled right turn at the end - indicating you were staying put over there – thank you – that showed you were aware of everything that was going on around you.

Except for the timing of the 3-point turn, excellent driving.

 

Incident 4

In incident 4 – same as incident 1 – the car coming out of the allyway nosing into the Bike Lane, AND not coming to a complete stop – same as above. With a car coming from behind – my ‘bail out’ was into your left front quarter panel.

 

See alot more of these Video Bicycle Rides at my Youtube Chaennel - http://www.youtube.com/user/michaelholloway111/videos

 

 

mh



Posted: March 14th, 2012
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