What do you love most about life?

Here’s what Ryan Van Duzer has to say about this journey:

Duzer Duz
Live.Love.Bike.

I began this journey on the beaches of San Diego by quoting Helen Keller, “Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all.”

Well I’ve been on countless daring adventures but none quite like this. Instead of focusing on the physical aspect, I wanted to take this opportunity to dive deep into my heart and soul, and challenge myself mentally. I needed a recharge and a little bike therapy was in order.

It felt incredibly freeing to move my body and mind all day long, I’d never felt so alive! Traveling at 15mph is the perfect speed to really FEEL the world and appreciate all of Mother Nature’s magic. But it wasn’t the spectacular sights that I’ll remember most about this trip. It’s the amazing people I met all across this great country. I was so lucky to have reconnected with old friends was blown away with how quickly I became close with total strangers. Their endless amounts of kindness and generosity humbled me and solidified my belief that there is a lot more good in this world than bad.

As I pedaled from big city to small town and everything in between I asked everyone I met a simple question, What do you love most about life? Their answers were simple, heartfelt and inspiring.

So now it’s my turn to talk about what I love most in life… Every single day, with each stroke of the pedal, I thought about all the people that I love and how lucky I am to have them in my life. and I thought about all the people I haven’t yet met and will someday love. My wife, my children, new friends, maybe even a dog. I love life, plain and simple…I know I’m not always gonna be a pefect human being, but I’m determined to follow my heart and spread as much love and happiness as possible…there’s nothing more important in this world.

My legs might be a little stronger after all this, but it’s my heart that has grown most on this journey.

The Successful Push for Safer Infrastructure

How many of these factors exist in North America today? Outrageous number of pedestrian and cyclist fatalities – Check. Absurd amounts of public space dedicated to the movement and storage of private vehicles – Check. Oil and financial crises – Double Check. Public outcry – Check. Political will to change – Very Little.

We’re seeing major changes in cities like New York, Chicago and in Canada Montreal, Vancouver and Ottawa. The addition of cycling infrastructure isn’t just to make cycling more attractive or easier. This is people-friendly infrastructure. These are changes that promote shorter commutes and allow citizens to spend less money on day-to-day transportation costs.

For more, read David Hembrow’s blog.

The Cargo Bike Revolution

True story. On my 15 minute walk to the dry cleaners today I passed four cargo bikes (three in use at the time), three bikes pulling trailers, a half-dozen bikes with child seats and countless bikes with baskets, crates and panniers.

For more info on the film go to lizcanning.com

Speed Vest is not what you think

Initially I assumed a “speed vest” was a vest that magically made you speedier. Thankfully, the actual speed vest is much different. Connecting to an off-the-shelf bicycle computer, the speed vest displays your current riding speed to drivers (and other cyclists) behind you. The idea is that motorists unfamiliar with driving around cyclists often misjudge their speed and the results are poor passes and right-hooks.

Want to make your own Speed Vest? Visit MAKE

Whiskey Drome (and a Mini Drome on the Way to Toronto)

Like mini dromes? Well, you’re in luck! October 8, 2011 the Red Bull Mini Drome is coming to Toronto… head to the Evergreen Brick Works. The event is free for spectators, qualifiers start at 2pm with the main event at 7:30pm.

More info at dandyhorsemagazine.com

Dutch Cycling Embassy

Cannondale Concept City Bike

This is 2 years old… but it’s new to me.

The locking handlebar is an interesting concept but wouldn’t work with Toronto post and ring racks. The rear rack is too ‘futury’ and also quite useless. Quaint video though.

Student graduation project at the TU Delft for Cannondale

Design: Wytze van Mansum | vanmansum.nl
Film: eelkedekker.nl

Music: Electric Sound Continuum
electricsoundcontinuum.blogspot.com/​

or you can buy the track here:
amazon.com/​Aerial-Trail-Electric-Sound-Continuum/​dp/​B002MPQJEM

The Prototype was built by Wytze van Mansum with the help of:

Wevab.com | Aluminium Constructions
SKF.com | Bearings
Rijsoort.nl | Bending
allesvoordefiets.nl | Dutch bicycle parts

Maya Pedal and Bicimaquinas

(For English subtitles click on the CC icon at the bottom of the video)

In 1997, in San Andrés Itzapa in Guatemala, Maya Pedal Association began recycling scraps of bicycles into Bicimáquinas.

Bicimáquinas are pedal-powered blenders, washing machines and threshing machines, eliminating the need for fuel and electricity. Pumps are also possible, and are capable of extracting 30 liters of water per minute from 30-meter deep wells (electronic pumps reach just to 12 meters).

The idea of these ingenious contraptions emerged from the desire to help the farming families of the San Andrés community. The issue that gave rise to Maya Pedal was the expense and shortage of electricity and fuel in the village.

Carlos and Cesar, creators of Maya Pedal, have achieved an extraordinary result: a worthy project that does not pollute and is extremely fascinating in its involvement of volunteers from around the world who are building a fantastic pedal revolution.

MayaPedal.org

Mia Birk at TEDxPortland – Pedalling Towards a Healthier Planet

Mia Birk: President — Alta Planning + Design
In her book Joyride: Pedaling Toward a Healthier Planet, Mia Birk tells the dramatic story of how a group of determined visionaries transformed Portland into a cycling mecca and inspired the nation. She has spent over 21 years creating active communities where bicycling and walking are safe and fun daily activities. Former bicycle program manager for the City of Portland, Mia is currently teaching urban studies at Portland State University and is the president of Alta Planning + Design.

Street Books: A pedal-powered library in Portland

Learn more about this inspiring project here: Street Books