How to Keep Riding Your Bicycle on Rainy Toronto Days

Red Rubber Boots and Training Wheels

Perhaps one of the greatest hurdles to really becoming an everyday bicycle rider is rain.

No one wants to show up to work soaked to the bone, but on a humid, rainy day, taking the TTC can feel like giving up, and if you have to wait for a bus or streetcar you’re still going to get wet.

I started rain riding by accident. Riding home I knew I was racing a storm. About half way through my ride the sky opened and within seconds I was soaked.

But I was also smiling, ear to ear. After a long day in an office a rain ride is refreshing, invigorating. It’s like going for a jog in your shower (if that was even possible). Rain riding feels great and you’ll be the envy of your workplace, soaked and smiling and buzzing all day. Sure, you can take to rain riding cold turkey, but a little preparation can help you really enjoy the ride. Here’s what to do:

1) Accept that you will get wet: Fact, you will get wet riding when the rain starts to fall and there’s nothing you can do about it. Some people will ride faster, as if trying to outrun the falling rain, and rushing can lead to poor decision making. Pedestrians will be dashing across streets heading for the nearest shelter and drivers will be distracted and nervous. If you’re rushing, trying to outrun the falling rain, you’re more likely to put yourself in dangerous situations. Slow down and accept getting a little wet, you’ll be safer for it.

2) Dress for a mess: You can go out and purchase rain shells to wear over your work clothes, but in my experience these keep the rain water out and also keep your sweat in, still leaving you soaked. Shelling out for rain gear can help you stay a little drier and more comfortable, but during warm summer rains simply wearing clothing you don’t mind getting wet and dirty works great. Quick drying fabrics will make storing your riding clothes at work less problematic, so a thick cotton t-shirt that takes a day to air dry may not be the best option.

3) Get the right equipment: Fenders! Get fenders for your bicycle. If you don’t have them they are probably keeping you from rain riding because no one wants that “skunk stain” running up their back. You can buy a set at your local bike shop for around $25 or $30 and pay a little extra to have them installed (or learn how to do it yourself). A decent set of panniers or backpack will keep your change of clothes dry. I have a set from Mountain Equipment Co-op that are water-resistant, so on wetter days I would place my clothes in a plastic bag first to keep out the little moisture that would seep in. Reusable lunch bags can be used for valuables like your phone and wallet. A plastic grocery bag can be used to cover your seat and keep it dry during the day. Also, bring your lights and use them, anything to make you stand out on the road is going to benefit your safety.

4) Slow your roll: Wet rims and brakes take longer to slow you down and wet roads increase your chance of skidding. And when there’s a lot of rain, you can even start to hydroplane slide on water-covered streets, which reduces your control. So simply slow down and enjoy the water streaming down your face, it’s wonderful.

5) Take the lane: Beware the gutter. Puddles can conceal potholes and uneven sewer coverings. Moving into the lane, ideally where the right side wheels of cars would typically roll, can save you from the unexpected and will force drivers to pass you with less speed and greater caution.

6) Use extra caution near streetcar tracks and crosswalks: Streetcar tracks can be a nightmare for some even during the best conditions. In the rain, not only are the tracks more slippery, but the smooth concrete surrounding them becomes a sliding hazard as well. Same goes for crosswalks that use paving stones as smooth surfaces mean less traction for narrow bicycle tires. When turning left on roads with streetcar tracks you can perform an “indirect left turn” to allow you to cross the tracks at a 90 degree angle. Or simply dismount from your bicycle and use the crosswalks.

7) Think “muti-modal” transportation: The TTC is currently installing better bicycle parking at subway stations around town. If you’re not comfortable riding in the rain for your entire commute you can still skip waiting for buses and streetcars and simply head to the nearest subway station. You may be a little wet on the subway, but you certainly won’t be the only one.

8) Have fun: Always remember, enjoy yourself. Getting wet may seem like a pain, but if you pack dry clothes and a small towel and once you get comfortable changing at work, you can simply start to enjoy the rain and beauty of a soaking wet city. You may also feel a little super-human for braving the rains, so don’t let that go to your head!

Photo via the BikingToronto Flickr Pool

Handling Street Car Tracks and Difficult Intersections With “Indirect Left Turns”

Indirect Left Turn Sign on Bloor at Sherbourne

What is an indirect left turn and how can it help you navigate streetcar tracks and other awkward intersections?

Making a left turn through a busy intersection can be a very tense situation for many cyclists. You’re worried about getting hit from behind, you’re trying to watch for oncoming vehicles, you’re watching the sidewalk for pedestrians, you’re hoping to cross streetcar tracks at a 90 degree angle and you can’t be sure everyone around you actually sees you waiting in the middle of all this.

To help make left turns a less stressful experience, the indirect left turn allows cyclists to proceed through an intersection on a green light in the curb lane (or bike lane should one be there) and join the curb lane of the cross street to wait for the next green light. This eliminates the hazards of waiting in the left most lane and allows cyclists to remain in the right most lane completing a left turn in a two part process.

In Toronto, there are 2 intersections where indirect left turns are suggested through existing infrastructure.

Heading West on Bloor Street in the bike lane extending from the Prince Edward Viaduct, an indirect left turn allows cyclists to turn from Bloor and head south on Sherbourne. Here’s an explanation from a 1997 issue of Cyclometer:

As you cycle west on Bloor St. towards Sherbourne St. there are two blue signs with a pictogram describing an ‘indirect left turn’ for westbound cyclists wanting to turn left onto Sherbourne. Cyclists can ride straight through on the westbound green and stop at the far curb in the white painted ‘box’ to wait for the southbound green light. To ensure that waiting cyclists aren’t in conflict with right turning drivers, the southbound ‘right turn on green’ has been prohibited. Also the crosswalk was moved north just enough so that cyclists don’t have to block the crosswalk while waiting for the southbound green. The ‘box’ is large enough to accommodate 2 or 3 cyclists at a time.

The bike lane and sign still exist (although the sign is hung exceptionally high for cyclists):

Bloor Street Bike Lane Sherbourne indirect left turn

Unfortunately, the past 13 years have not been kind to the “box”:

Box location for indirect left turn Sherbourne

Early Bike Box location Sherbourne

The second location where an indirect left turn is suggested for cyclists is at the awkward intersection of Dupont, Dundas Street West and Annette.

In order to get to the bike lane on Annette from the bike lane on Dupont, simply follow the sharrows. While I did not notice a sign explaining the turn at this intersection, the sharrows quite clearly illustrate a path for cyclists:

Sharrows for indirect left turn at Dupont Dundas Street West

Sharrows connect Old Weston Road to Annette bike lane

The indirect left turn is also popular with motorists at this intersection as I witnessed 4 drivers make a similar move on the underused Old Weston Road to avoid waiting in the left turn lane.

Indirect left turns are a great way to help people on bikes build confidence on busier roads where turning left can be both nerve-wracking and dangerous. In fact, the Toronto Cyclists Handbook even recommends this strategy, calling it a “two-part left-turn from right of lane”:

I’ve used this turning method at intersections with streetcar tracks and multiple traffic lanes and you’re bound to witness it at many intersections along Spadina. However, is it legal to make this type of turn?

I contacted Sgt. Tim Burrows of Traffic Services and here’s what he had to offer on the subject:

Why I like the indirect left turn.

1.) Avoid potential conflict by trying to cut through traffic to move into
proper turn position. (safer)
2.) Most drivers expect to see bicycles on right side of road adding to the
‘predictability factor,’ (safer)
3.) Riders can always keep eyes forward, with glances to left/right for
safety instead of turning back to get a ‘big picture.’ (safer)
4.) Faster (better for cyclist)

Intersections are one of the most dangerous areas for all our road users
and especially so for our vulnerable groups such as cyclists.  Anytime we
can find safer means for them to travel…its better for all of us.

The Sherbourne site has one draw back. The sign shows a painted stop line,
but there isn’t one.  Maybe this is a given, but I wouldn’t want cyclists
to think they are supposed to drive into the pedestrian walk way, nor have
officers ticketing a cyclist for riding too close to the crosswalk.

As long as you stay out of the crosswalk indirect left turns are a perfectly acceptable and possibly even faster way to make a left turn on a bicycle at busier intersections.

While I’m uncertain if there are plans to add indirect left turn infrastructure in the current Bike Plan, Toronto may soon see something similar in the form of “Bike Boxes.”

Over at Giddy Up Toronto, a blogger has suggested that we use indirect left turn boxes instead of the proposed bike boxes. The planned bike boxes would allow cyclists to move to the head of the line at red lights and position themselves for a left turn from the centre-most lane. While this clearly marks a space where cyclists will be turning it doesn’t address the issue that you’re still in a position that makes it difficult to cross streetcar tracks at a 90 degree angle. Both our planned bike boxes and indirect left turn boxes work best when right turns are prohibited on red lights, but only the indirect left turn box positions cyclists to safely cross streetcar tracks.

The most important aspect when considering any piece of infrastructure, and this is something that Sgt. Burrows also mentions, is that we create an environment that promotes predictable behaviour. Intersections, especially busy ones with streetcar right-of-ways and multiple lanes (including bike lanes) provide the greatest opportunity for serious collisions. Clearly marking paths for all users helps to promote predictable behaviours and can keep all road users “on the same page” reducing the possibility of confusion and ultimately collisions.

Update November 12, 2010: A sign explaining indirect left turns has been posted at the Dupont/Dundas/Annette intersection. Although to make this sort of turn here as indicated means you’re now blocking the bike lane. Here’s the sign as photographed by Martinho:

P1010685