Whiskey Drome (and a Mini Drome on the Way to Toronto)

Like mini dromes? Well, you’re in luck! October 8, 2011 the Red Bull Mini Drome is coming to Toronto… head to the Evergreen Brick Works. The event is free for spectators, qualifiers start at 2pm with the main event at 7:30pm.

More info at dandyhorsemagazine.com

A Whole Foods With a Bicycle Service Station

Photo by Prolly

Via Prolly Is Not Probably

The photo above is of a bicycle service station at the Whole Foods Flagship store in Austin, TX. It’s free to use and comes equipped with tools and a pump and you can hang your bicycle from the saddle to make repairs.

More photos here: New Bicycle Repair Stand at Whole Foods Flagship

While I’m unaware of any such station in Toronto, I do know that to encourage and support cycling the Evergreen Brick Works site in the Don Valley has a bicycle service station called the Bike Works.

What do you think of the Whole Foods bicycle service station? Would knowing that there’s a service station encourage you to cycle longer distances when running errands?

Facts Behind the New Vertical Stagger Bike Racks

This past year a new bicycle rack design began landing on Toronto streets. You’ll find these racks in the bicycle shelter at the St. Clair West TTC subway stop and scattered around the Evergreen Brick Works awaiting permanent installation.

Made by Peak Racks, a San Luis Obispo based company, I really like how these racks separate locked bicycles keeping them from scraping against each other. Their staggered “up and down” design is to allow for a more efficient use of space and the thin, but sturdy, metal contact points make using smaller u-locks far easier than with post and ring bicycle racks.

The racks are made from recycled materials and I look forward to seeing more of these across the city.

Learn more at Peak Racks.

Evergreen Brick Works Helps Usher In Cycling Infrastructure on Bayview

Don Valley Brick Works - Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Evergreen Brick Works recently held their grand opening, and while events and a market have been held at the site all summer, access by bicycle has been somewhat limited.

Bayview, a street where the speed limit increases to 70 km/h (meaning 90 km/h to far too many drivers) in front of the Brick Works also has crumbling shoulders. Certainly an uninviting situation for anyone on two wheels.

However, the revitalization of the once abandoned site is bringing in cycling and pedestrian infrastructure. In an e-mail from Dave Dunn of Cycling Infrastructure and Programs for the City of Toronto he explained that a new bi-directional and physically separated multi-use path will now connect the Rosedale Valley Drive multi-use trail to the Brick Works site. As well, a connection to Pottery Road will allow cyclists and pedestrians to access the site from the Lower Don Trail.

For added safety, Jersey barriers will be installed along Bayview separating cycling and pedestrian traffic, and the wooden bridge that runs under the Bayview access to the Don Valley Parkway is being repaired.

Here’s a Google Map created by Christina Bouchard detailing the changes currently being installed along Bayview (click for more details):

Photo via Flickr