What do you love most about life?

Here’s what Ryan Van Duzer has to say about this journey:

Duzer Duz
Live.Love.Bike.

I began this journey on the beaches of San Diego by quoting Helen Keller, “Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all.”

Well I’ve been on countless daring adventures but none quite like this. Instead of focusing on the physical aspect, I wanted to take this opportunity to dive deep into my heart and soul, and challenge myself mentally. I needed a recharge and a little bike therapy was in order.

It felt incredibly freeing to move my body and mind all day long, I’d never felt so alive! Traveling at 15mph is the perfect speed to really FEEL the world and appreciate all of Mother Nature’s magic. But it wasn’t the spectacular sights that I’ll remember most about this trip. It’s the amazing people I met all across this great country. I was so lucky to have reconnected with old friends was blown away with how quickly I became close with total strangers. Their endless amounts of kindness and generosity humbled me and solidified my belief that there is a lot more good in this world than bad.

As I pedaled from big city to small town and everything in between I asked everyone I met a simple question, What do you love most about life? Their answers were simple, heartfelt and inspiring.

So now it’s my turn to talk about what I love most in life… Every single day, with each stroke of the pedal, I thought about all the people that I love and how lucky I am to have them in my life. and I thought about all the people I haven’t yet met and will someday love. My wife, my children, new friends, maybe even a dog. I love life, plain and simple…I know I’m not always gonna be a pefect human being, but I’m determined to follow my heart and spread as much love and happiness as possible…there’s nothing more important in this world.

My legs might be a little stronger after all this, but it’s my heart that has grown most on this journey.

The Successful Push for Safer Infrastructure

How many of these factors exist in North America today? Outrageous number of pedestrian and cyclist fatalities – Check. Absurd amounts of public space dedicated to the movement and storage of private vehicles – Check. Oil and financial crises – Double Check. Public outcry – Check. Political will to change – Very Little.

We’re seeing major changes in cities like New York, Chicago and in Canada Montreal, Vancouver and Ottawa. The addition of cycling infrastructure isn’t just to make cycling more attractive or easier. This is people-friendly infrastructure. These are changes that promote shorter commutes and allow citizens to spend less money on day-to-day transportation costs.

For more, read David Hembrow’s blog.

The Cargo Bike Revolution

True story. On my 15 minute walk to the dry cleaners today I passed four cargo bikes (three in use at the time), three bikes pulling trailers, a half-dozen bikes with child seats and countless bikes with baskets, crates and panniers.

For more info on the film go to lizcanning.com

Dutch Cycling Embassy

Maya Pedal and Bicimaquinas

(For English subtitles click on the CC icon at the bottom of the video)

In 1997, in San Andrés Itzapa in Guatemala, Maya Pedal Association began recycling scraps of bicycles into Bicimáquinas.

Bicimáquinas are pedal-powered blenders, washing machines and threshing machines, eliminating the need for fuel and electricity. Pumps are also possible, and are capable of extracting 30 liters of water per minute from 30-meter deep wells (electronic pumps reach just to 12 meters).

The idea of these ingenious contraptions emerged from the desire to help the farming families of the San Andrés community. The issue that gave rise to Maya Pedal was the expense and shortage of electricity and fuel in the village.

Carlos and Cesar, creators of Maya Pedal, have achieved an extraordinary result: a worthy project that does not pollute and is extremely fascinating in its involvement of volunteers from around the world who are building a fantastic pedal revolution.

MayaPedal.org

Street Books: A pedal-powered library in Portland

Learn more about this inspiring project here: Street Books

Godspeed

Godspeed or God Speed comes from the Middle English expression “God spede (you)”, a wish for success and fortune for one setting out on an enterprise, voyage, adventure, or travels. (wikipedia)

Made for Artcrank 2011 this print uses real bike parts for all elements. More here.

Nona Varnado shows us how to get reflective

Visit Nona Varnado
and The Bird Wheel

fietsenpakhuis is a parking garage I’d live in

In Zaanstad, Netherlands there was a parking problem on the main retail strip. A bicycle parking problem.

Built to accommodate 700 bicycles, in a city with only 145,000 residents, fietsenpakhuis reflects the “Zaanse” industrial architecture style of the city and supports the residents and visitors who bike daily in the area.

The floor is paved with bricks connecting it visually to the street outside and in the large front windows stored bicycles and bicycle repair stations will be visible. The space also includes bicycle rental, storage lockers and public washrooms.

More photos at Contemporist and learn more about Zaanstad here.

Detroit Bike City

Via Grist