Mark Ronson’s The Bike Song (featuring Kyle Falconer and Spankrock)

This video has the same feel as those 1980s Sesame Street shorts that explored how stuff is made. Fun song and a fun “cycle chic” video.

Via Creativity-online

How to Get Better Bicycle Parking for Your Condo

Urban Garden & a half-stolen bike

I was recently contacted by a BikingToronto reader, Ian, in need of contact information for bike rack suppliers in Toronto. He told me that he had recently moved into a newer condo building near Bloor and Spadina. The building has bicycle parking, but after speaking with other residents and noticing the mess of bikes in their outdoor racks it was clear that his condo building needed better bicycle parking.

Part of why living in a downtown condo building is appealing is the ability to free yourself from needing a car to get everywhere. Ian’s building is near a TTC station and is a comfortable cycling distance from his office. He owns several bicycles and is concerned about keeping them in good condition and free from theft for as long as possible. The current set up in his building doesn’t satisfy both of those conditions. While the most accessible outdoor parking is covered, it is in an alleyway that anyone can walk down. The racks are also cluttered and that means his bicycle is going to get scraped and bounced around in addition to possibly being stolen.

If this sounds familiar, Ian’s story and how a cycling committee in his building approached the board of directors may help you get better bicycle parking for your condo.

While condo builders are adding amenities such as rooftop pools, bowling alleys and fitness centres it seems that bicycle parking isn’t a top priority when space is defined and the building begins. Bicycle racks are often placed in out of the way areas that are hard to access, feature inappropriate racks or simply do not exist at all.

Recent amendments to Toronto Zoning By-laws have added more information on bicycle parking guidelines, yet these focus mostly on quantity of available spaces and less on quality of space provided.

Here then is how to get better bicycle parking for your condo.

Your first point of contact is your condo board. Find out if others have approached them about available bicycle parking. In Ian’s case, a bicycle committee was formed to determine the bicycle parking needs of tenants and to propose improvements.

Bicyles Will Be Removed

The committee then surveyed the building by distributing a questionnaire to determine the current state of bicycle parking as viewed by tenants. Below is a sample survey:

1. How satisfied are you with the current bike parking/storage arrangement?

2. How many bicycles does your household have (write the number 0, 1, 2…9 in each of the spaces provided):

_____Adult-size _____Child-size (small bikes) _____Tricycles (very small child) _____Electric Bikes _____Other

3. Where are your unit’s bikes currently stored? (please indicate the quantity of bikes in each location)

_____Outside – racks at back of building

_____Outside – post and rings in front of building

_____Ground floor “Visitor Bike Parking” room

_____P1

_____Storage locker

_____Balcony

_____Apartment

_____Other location: _________________________

4. Do you have a car parking spot?

5. Would you be interested in having a bike rack mounted to the wall behind your car?

6. How much would you be willing to spend (rack + installation) ? $_________

7. Please rank your preference (1=first choice; 5=last choice) of where you’d like to store your bicycle(s):

_____Outside – racks at back of building

_____Ground floor “Visitor Bike Parking” room

_____P1

_____Other location: ________________________

_____Bike rack mounted to the wall behind my car

8. Would you be willing to pay for an indoor reserved bike parking spot? qYes qNo

9. This question is about how often the people in your unit ride. If you don’t ride in the winter, just ignore the winter months. How many people in your household ride:

daily (4+ times per week) …….. _____

weekly (1-3 times per week)…. _____

monthly (1-3 times per month). _____

less often than monthly………… _____

10. Have you had any bicycles or bicycle parts stolen from in or around the Condo?

11. Have you registered your bike with the Toronto Police? qYes qNo (http://www.torontopolice.on.ca/bike)

12. Please share any other bike parking or storage ideas:

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

If you do not currently store a bicycle in the building, please make sure to return this survey with “No”

checked below. This is important for the committee to understand the needs of the building residents

and to evaluate the survey response rate. Thank you very much for your participation.

Does someone in your unit currently store one or more bicycles in or outside the building?

Optional:

If you provide us with your name & contact information, we will be able to contact you as soon as more

bike parking & storage options become available.

Your answers on this survey will be used only to guide us, not to commit you to anything.

Name: ______________________________________________ Suite #: ________ Parking Spot #: ________

Phone: ________________________ E-mail: ____________________________________________________

Please contact me as soon as more information is available Yes No

we meet again

Ian reports that the survey was well-received by tenants in the building and the response was more than enough to help guide them in creating an improved bicycle parking proposal for the condo board.

Using the survey results you’ll be able to identify problem areas and find out how much parking needs to be added and where residents would prefer the parking be located.

In Ian’s building it was determined that the outdoor parking was not properly laid out and created a cluttered and potentially bicycle damaging situation when using the racks. Indoor bicycle parking was limited and the racks did not provide secure locking options. Space was identified for additional parking in the underground parking lot of the building yet access and security both posed problems requiring passing through multiple doors which can be difficult with a bicycle and parcels.

Secure bicycle parking means racks that are permanently anchored to the ground or wall with enough contact points to lock both a bicycle frame and wheel. Racks should be spaced to allow for many sizes of bicycles and allow for clearance between them to assist in parking and removing a bicycle.

A bicycle user group for the City of Toronto recommends these bicycle rack manufacturers and models:

Cora Bike Rack Ltd.
www.cora.com
Tel: 1-800-739-4609
Model: Expo Bike Rack

Trystan Bike Racks
www.trystanproducts.com
68 Swan Street
Ayr, ON N0B 1E0
Tel: (519) 632-7427
Fax: (519) 632-8271
Model: TD1

Bike Rack Co.
www.bikerack.ca
395 Signet St.
Toronto, ON M9L 1V3
Tel: (416) 927-7499
Model: The lock up 1 and lock up 2

In order to make your bicycle parking proposal a professional one, be sure to contact suppliers as well as potential installers and determine the full costs of purchasing, shipping and installing. I’d also recommend contacting someone who can help you adhere to fire codes when determining where to install the racks.

Ian told me that after approaching his condo board they have been approved to make changes to the existing parking and a budget was given. The final move now is for the board to act on the recommendations of the cycling committee and put the plans into action.

If you’re disappointed in the current state of bicycle parking in your condo, then now is the time to do something about it.

Additional link: City of Toronto Guidelines for the Design and Management of Bicycle Parking Facilities

Photos via the BikingToronto Flickr Pool

Secure Bike Locking for Any Budget

DSC_3353

There’s a fantastic post on the Toronto Cyclists Union web site about how to help prevent bicycle theft. You should go read it here: “Bike Theft: Still An Issue In Toronto – Tips on Prevention

But how can you follow these tips and not spend more on bike locks and parts than you did on your bicycle itself?

The good news is that you have options. Here are a few recommendations to help you save money and still secure your bicycle:

1) The bike messenger chain: What may seem to be an exceptionally heavy belt on the courier who just left your local coffee shop is actually their bike lock. A chain lock allows you to secure your wheels and frame to racks and posts and you can adjust the length for a snug fit. Lock manufacturers like ABUS and Kryptonite sell versions of the heavy chain and lock combo.

ABUS Catena 685 Shadow http://www.abus.de/us/main.asp?ScreenLang=us&sid=798488795201352040820109925440120&select=0104b02&artikel=4003318203626Kryptonite New York Chain https://www.kryptonitelock.com/products/ProductDetail.aspx?cid=1001&scid=1002&pid=1193

These lock and chain combos start at $100 and can cost more than $200 for high end models. While heavy to carry, chains are effective theft deterrents. To save yourself a little money, head over to a hardware store and purchase a sturdy steel chain by the foot and pair it with a strong lock.

2) U-lock and cable combo: U-locks are the most recommended lock style for preventing theft. Used properly, one u-lock can be enough to deter a thief.  However, to secure your wheels and frame, a cable and u-lock can work together to make your bicycle a less-appealing target.

Kryptonite Series 2 and Flex cableOn Guard Mini with cable

Higher end cable and u-lock combos can cost upwards of $200. However, MEC has a similar style for just $27.00. I own one of these and have had zero problems with it, but a friend of mine dropped theirs and the entire lock body disassembled into a dozen pieces.

3) Anti-theft Skewers: In the early 90s everyone wanted quick-release skewers. I remember being lured by their simplicity, looking down on anyone who couldn’t quickly adjust their seatpost or remove their front wheel. Then my seat was stolen. Since that day, I’ve sworn off quick-releases and have been replacing the ones on my bikes. Skewers can be easily swapped out and replaced with regular ones with nuts on either end. However, a simple wrench can remove these too. That’s why several companies have introduced anti-theft skewers that require special tools to remove, something not carried by your average bicycle thief.

Pinhead Skewers http://www.pinheadcomponents.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=35&Itemid=56&lang=en50-6685-NCL-SIDE

Higher-end skewers by Pinhead cost around $100 for a set. MEC also sells a set of front and rear anti-theft skewers for $29.00.

It’s important to remember that a bicycle lock is only as effective as the locking technique used. Always try to eliminate dead space between your bicycle and what you are locking to. Increasing the number of components that can’t be removed easily is also a great way to keep your bicycle with you much longer.

Not sure what bike lock style is right for you? Head over to your local bike shop and see what they recommend.

Alleged Bike Thief Foils Bad Lock Job

I certainly don’t want to pour salt on anyone’s wounds with this post. Having your bicycle stolen is a painful, soul-crushing experience that leaves you feeling helpless and probably pissed off since you must now walk or transit home, the two things you were trying to avoid by riding your bicycle in the first place.

Below is a cell phone photo of an alleged bicycle thief holding a Globe Roll bicycle with dubious bell placement.

Alleged bicycle thief http://ow.ly/i/2JjB

And this is the dubious bell placement:

Crotch placed bell

Ummm… you ring that how (or with what)?

And here’s the “opportunity” this alleged bicycle thief chose to exploit and obtain a new, albeit single-wheeled, bicycle:

Kryptonite and the wheel

And here’s the end result:

Just a wheel and a lock http://twitpic.com/275j04

Of course, if you’re the inventor of the wheel (and comb) you’ve got your ride home. If not, you’re left with a painful reminder of the ride home that could have been.

If you see this Globe Roll with a spoiled blue/grey colourway then be sure to alert the proper authorities.

And, to be constructive, you can get away with locking just one wheel and not return to have in your possession one locked wheel. Bike thieves look for opportunities. A thin coil lock is an easy target if you have wire cutters. If you’re out thieving with just a wrench, you look for nuts you can unscrew. While you can never completely “thief-proof” a bicycle, here’s how to prevent this type of theft by locking through the rear triangle:

Final photo via commutebybike

Alleged bike thief photo via Twitter.

How to Lock Your Bike Properly – Do You Make the Grade?

Hal Ruzal on StreetFilms

I cringe every time I see an expensive u-lock only holding a front wheel (with a quick release) to a bike rack. I cringe every time I see a thin coil lock being used as the only barrier between a beautiful commuter bike and a thief. If you’re not sure how to properly lock your bike (trust me, it’s simple when you know what to do) then here’s a fantastic video to help show you the best way to lock a bicycle. Do you make the grade?

Updating a Bike Theft Success Story in Toronto

well locked bike

Having your bicycle stolen is an emotional roller-coaster.
Anger, disbelief, regret, denial… you’re going to experience it all. The only sure things in life are death, taxes and bike theft; although many people strive to avoid all three.
In July, Spacing Toronto told us the amazing story of a stolen bicycle recovery.
Heather McKibbon’s story involved undercover police, disguised friends and the use of social media sites Facebook and Kijiji to rescue her stolen ride.
The Wall Street Journal has picked up on Heather’s story and they look at the growing trend in bicycle theft:

San Diego saw a 45% increase in reported bike thefts in the first half of this year from a year earlier. The police station covering the central part of downtown Los Angeles has seen a 72% increase in stolen-bike reports so far this year, the city’s police department says. Austin and Philadelphia have seen increases for the past two years. The incidence of theft is likely even higher, cycling advocates say, because many victims don’t bother reporting bike thefts.

The reasons for the theft boom are complex, including population growth in some locales, but generally, more people are biking these days—and they are riding pricier bicycles. Also, the economic downturn is contributing to the increase.

“Harder times mean more thefts,” says Bryan Hance, founder of StolenBicycleRegistry.com, where people can list their stolen bikes free. Last month, the site received 335 listings, about twice as many as a year ago. “Bikes are a lot more expensive than they were five or 10 years ago,” he adds. “The fact that they are worth more makes them more of a target.”

And, unfortunately, Heather’s story doesn’t have a happy ending:

Ms. McKibbon, who recovered her bike in Toronto, also faced new problems. Last weekend, her bike’s rims, gears and other components were stolen on a busy street in Toronto.

But she has a message for bike thieves: Watch your back. “The world isn’t as big as it once was,” she says. “You never know who’s watching.”

Have you recently had your bicycle stolen? Post your details in the Biking Toronto Stolen Bike Listing

Photo by random dude on Flickr