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How Bike-Friendly is your City Councillor?

How Bike-Friendly is your City Councillor?A couple days ago we let you know about the Bike Union publishing how a bunch of City Councillors (the ones who participated in TCATs election survey) have voted on bikelane installation motions before City Council during the last few years.

Here at BikingToronto we decided to take it one step further and figure out (Google Doc) exactly who were the bike-friendliest Councillors in terms of Council voting (and who were the most bike-UNfriendliest).

The chart below takes all the voting records in the Bike Union document and gave Councillors +1 point when they made a bike-friendly vote and -1 point when they either made a bike-UNfriendly vote or didn’t bother to show up to vote.

Now we can all see, quickly and easily, who is the friendliest and who is the unfriendliest.

How Bike-Friendly is your City Councillor?

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TCAT Releases Results of Election Survey

The Toronto Coalition for Active Transportation (TCAT) released the results of its 2010 Municipal Candidate Election Surveys yesterday:

TCAT surveyed all Toronto candidates to provide voters the candidates’ views on active transportation issues and the concrete steps that can be taken to improve cycling and walking in Toronto. Surveys were sent in August 2010 to all of the mayoral, councillor and school trustee candidates – 475 candidates in total, with 137 respondents to date.

Some of the cycling-related questions were as follows:

Full Implementation of the Bike Plan
  • What year will the Bike Plan be implemented?
  • How will you prevent the delays that have plagued the implementation of the Bike Plan for the past nine years?
Increase the use of cycling and walking to conduct city business
  • Increasing the number of employees using bikes in the course of their duties
  • Increasing the use of bike and foot couriers
  • Ensuring all city buildings and recreational facilities have a sufficient number of secure bicycle parking facilities
  • Exploring new purchasing policies that utilize local businesses to decrease dependency on motor-vehicle deliveries
  • What goal will you set for each of the above programs and services?
Creating a bike lane on Bloor Street/Danforth Avenue
  • Do you support building a new major east-west bicycle lane on Bloor Street and Danforth Avenue?
Improving pedestrian and cyclist access to public transit
  • Do you support integrating active transportation into the transit system?
Creating more on-street bicycle parking corrals throughout Toronto
  • Do you support creating more on-street bicycle parking corrals throughout Toronto to improve active transportation?
  • How many more on-street bicycle parking spaces will you create?
Some aggregate results from TCAT:
  • A Complete Streets Policy for Toronto: 69% per cent of 13 mayoral candidates and 77% of 84 council candidates strongly support developing and implementing a Complete Streets policy. This policy would ensure our streets are routinely designed to provide the safe travel of all road users, including cyclists and pedestrians.
  • Full implementation of the Toronto Walking Strategy by 2019: 54% of 13 mayoral candidates and 79% of 84 council candidates say they would fully staff and fund the Pedestrian Projects Unit of the Public Realm Section.
  • Building a new major east-west bicycle lane on Bloor Street and Danforth Avenue: 46% of 13 mayoral candidates and 45% of 83 council candidates strongly support this important artery for cyclists.
You can see individual responses as well:
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College Street Cycling Survey – Call for Participants

From the City of Toronto:


The City of Toronto is working with the Toronto Coalition for Active Transportation (TCAT) and the Clean Air Partnership (CAP) to evaluate cycling conditions on College Street before and after the installation of a new  bicycle pavement marking application – and we need your help.

What will I need to do?

  • Complete an online survey about your experience cycling on College St between Lansdowne Ave and Manning Ave on one day in April and one day in June.

When is the survey happening?

  • Part 1: April 19th to May 3rd, 2010
  • Part 2: June 14th to 18th, 2010

Who can participate?

  • Cyclists who ride along College St. during rush hour, for at least a couple blocks between Lansdowne Ave and Manning Ave. Rush hour is from 7:00 to 9:00 a.m. and 3:30 to 6:00 p.m., Monday to Friday.
  • All participants must be 18 years of age or older.

How can I sign up?

  • Contact us by email at bikeplan@toronto.ca to sign up. For all emails, please include “College Street Survey” in the subject line and indicate:
    • your name,
    • preferred email address for correspondence, and
    • what section of College Street you cycle on (e.g. Brock Ave to Clinton St).
  • The City of Toronto will not be responsible for any injury or damage related to the completion of the survey form. Information will be collected in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

Visit www.toronto.ca/cycling for more details.


You can also find City related news and posts in the City of Toronto section here on BikingToronto.

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Shoppers Love Bikelanes, Along with some Merchants

Bloor and Runnymede

Bloor and Runnymede

The Clean Air Partnership released a study today (PDF) about the attitudes of shoppers in the upscale Bloor West Village towards altering the street design of Bloor Street to allow for bikelanes and/or wider sidewalks.

As Duncan has already quoted on his blog:

The dominant mode of transportation in the Bloor West Village is walking, followed by public transit. Only 1 in 5 of visitors surveyed reported driving to the neighbourhood and parking there. The visitor survey data indicate that the majority (58%) support changes to the street use allocation. Curiously, cycling is the least frequent mode of transportation in this neighbourhood, and yet nearly 75% of those visitors who preferred a change in street use allocation would prefer the addition of a bike lane.

Visitor survey respondents who reported that they usually drive, were found to visit less frequently and spend significantly less money per month in the neighbourhood than those who did not drive. Visitors who preferred changes in street use allocation spend significantly more in the neighbourhood than those who prefer no change.

In terms of merchant perceptions of the impacts of changes in street use allocation, 54% of merchants in Bloor West Village indicated that they would expect no change or an increase in their number of daily customers as a result of either a bike lane or widened sidewalks, even if half of the on-street parking were to be removed in order to accommodate the changes.

This follows up last year’s study release of the same name “Bike Lanes, On-Street Parking and Business” (PDF) that looked at the same kind of perceptions of shoppers and merchants in Bloor’s Annex neighbourhood.  The results are much the same – that most shoppers get to stores via walking or public transit, and that they tend to shop more often and spend more money than drivers do, and that both shoppers and merchants would like to see bikelanes.

So, what does this tell us?  It says the despite a media generated “war on the car”, what we are seeing from City Hall when they pursue transit-friendly, bike-friendly and pedestrian-friendly initiatives, it is a response to the residents and merchants of neighbourhoods who want more livable, breathable, and friendly streets.

After all, Toronto is a “City of Neighbourhoods”, not a “City of Highways”.  Don’t let anyone tell you that should change.

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