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New Plan calls for Cyclist and Pedestrian Friendly Yonge Street

Great news being reported by the Star this morning.  There is a “bold new plan” that calls for Yonge street sidewalks to be widened, narrowing car traffic to one lane in each direction (along with sharrows for bike traffic).

The report, to be released Wednesday, proposes dramatic changes in the section between Dundas and Gerrard Sts., including widening sidewalks, reducing car traffic to two lanes, and making it pedestrian only for special festivals.

The Yonge Street Planning Framework, written by Ken Greenberg of Greenberg Consultants and Marianne McKenna of KPMB Architects, is a blueprint for turning around this tired area that includes historic buildings, a new 75-storey condo tower and Ryerson University.

It’s designed to improve the public space, make the area more welcoming for retailers and encourage small businesses, including high-tech ventures, to set up shop.

Read about the plan at the Toronto Star’s website

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Tonight’s Sharrow meeting CANCELLED

Urgent Message from the City of Toronto

Because of an error discovered in the Rush-Hour Sharrow Evaluation data analysis, tonight’s public meeting has been CANCELLED.

The City of Toronto does not wish to misrepresent the data collected as part of this project, and so the data collected must be re-evaluated in full before any findings may be presented publicly.

THERE WILL BE NO MEETING TONIGHT: Thursday January 20th, 2011

We apologise for any inconvenience to those who had planned to attend tonight’s meeting.

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On The Blogs: Harbord Sharrows Miss the Point

Sharrows Miss the Point on HarbordDuncan posts about the newly painted sharrows that are now filling the Harbord “bikelane gap”.  He makes the very good point that Harbord is one of the busiest bikelanes in the city, and the bikelane could have been completed but wasn’t due to the cause of saving a few car parking spaces:

Ignoring the fact that this is one of the most direct east/west bicycle routes connecting west end residents to downtown work and school this gap reflects the overall disinterest in the City of Toronto for providing continuous, consistent and much needed bicycle infrastructure.

Like placing a band-aid over an axe wound, sharrows, painted stencils that encourage motorists and drivers to ride right over them, now “fill” the gap.

There’s no denying that space is limited along this street. Yet while further west street parking alternates sides of the street to accommodate bike lanes this effective use of space is ignored and instead pictures of bicycles place cyclists directly in the door zone.

Read the full post (with photos) at Duncan’s City Ride.

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On The Blogs: Sharrows on Spadina?

What Happened to the “Bike Lane” on Spadina?Duncan asks the question about the changing bike infrastructure on Spadina.  Gone is the bike gutter white stripe (I don’t even know if that was ever intended as a bikelane) in preparation for sharrows:

What exactly is going on with the blacked out “bike lane” on Spadina Avenue?

Well, what may or may not actually have been intended to be a bike lane is now gone, sanded away leaving a thick black stripe in its place. According to the Toronto Cyclists Union the stripe is to soon be replaced by sharrows:

What’s Up with Spadina – where’d that lane go?

Many of you will have noticed that the ‘gutter lane’, the white stripe that ran along the edge of the curb lane all the way along Spadina Ave., was scrubbed off the roadway about two weeks ago.  Please note that this was done in order to prepare the roadway for the application of Sharrows on most of Spadina, and full bike lanes where the road widens enough to fit them in at Spadina circle.

The City has not been able to provide us with a specific application date, but we have been assured that they will be implemented before the end of the season.

Read more about sharrows and the full post on Duncan’s City Ride

Spadina photo from the Bike Union

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On The Blogs: Mapping the McDonell Sharrows

Micheal Holloway decided to map out the latest effort by the Urban Repair Squad… the two-way sharrows on McDonell Ave:

Apparently, The Urban Repair Squad wants to help create social change through public awareness via non-violent urban gorilla actions – like using non-permanent, non-toxic water based paints to add “two-way sharrows” on the pavement of Mcdonnel Avenue. So, to popularize the action I made a Google Map

See the map on Michael Holloway’s Blog

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