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Deal: 4 LED Valve Stem Lights for just 10 Bucks

It’s not often that something cool AND bike-related shows up on one of those Groupon-like deal sites, but “TeamBuy” has a very cool one going on now, so I wanted to share because 1) these valve stem lights look very cool, 2) the more lighting we all have on our bike, the better, and 3) it’s a pretty sweet deal.

From now until Sunday at midnight, you can score 4 of these lights for just $10 (regularly $40).

Details after the graphics:

$10 for 4 Motion Activated LED Valve Stem Lights ($40 Value)

$10 for 4 Motion Activated LED Valve Stem Lights ($40 Value)

Highlights

  • Motion activated, flash automatically when the vehicle moves.
  • Easy installment, screw it into the tire valve stem of your car, bicycle or motorcycle.
  • Super bright, energy saving, and long lifespan LED.
  • Increases night time and bad weather visibility for safety.

Buy Details

  • Includes 4 Motion Activated LED Valve Stem Lights.
  • Available in Blue and Pink Choose from 4 Blue or 4 Pink OR a set of 2 Blue and 2 Pink.
  • Max 4 per person. Max 4 as gifts. Tax included.
  • Expected Shipping Time: Please allow 2-3 weeks for shipping.
Features / Specifications
  • Built in LED light and movement sensor!
  • Fits cars, motorbikes, bicycles – (adapter included).
  • When you drive the lights come on creating a circle of light effect on the wheels.
  • Install them in seconds, no need for wiring – simply screw onto the valve stem.
  • Comes in a two cool colour options: Pink and Blue.
  • Made of durable metal and plastic!
How you get it
  • Purchase your TeamBuy and choose your colour option.
  • Pay the $5 shipping charge at checkout and enter in your address information.
  • Product will be mailed out to you within 2-3 weeks of the offer ending.

 

Click here to buy 4 LED lights for your valve stems for just $10.

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Light Your Bike! Mini-Monkey Spoke Light Review

NOTE: This is a guest post by Emma Jenkin, who wrote a great post for BikingToronto back in September about making a DIY TRON LightBike, and returns to review Mini-Monkey Spokelights! Learn more about Emma at the bottom of this post.

It’s a little after 5:00pm and I’m leaving work. Mid-November. Of course it’s pitch dark outside. It’s depressing. It’s cold.

And there are cyclists out with no lights or reflective clothing. Other cyclists have a variety of red and white LEDs.  It should be noted that by law you need to have a white light on the front of your bike and a red light or red reflector on the rear of your bike from at least 30 minutes before sunset until 30 minutes after sunrise in this great city of Toronto. Sunset comes before 5:00pm and sunrise after 7:00am these days.

As I’ve written before, I don’t feel comfortable enough cycling home in the dark with two sole LED lights. My TRON lights help in a huge way. Then I was lucky enough to get my hands on a Mini Monkey Electric light.

Fresh from the package, the Monkey Electric is bare bones – a wired piece of plastic, accompanied by foam spacers, zip-ties, and a battery pack. I wasn’t sure how this little thing was going to light up my wheel like the website would have me believe. But after adding three AA batteries (not included) and playing with the buttons (three of them control the intensity, colour, and pattern of the lights) I was sold.

The lights were bright. And awesome. I could even make out the different patterns if I shook it hard enough.

Installation was a breeze. The foam spacers go between the Monkey Electric and your spokes, and all is held snugly in place with the zip-ties. A metal strap is even included as a thief-proof safety feature.

Riding with them? A blast. This week alone I’ve been complimented on them by kids, parents, police officers, and fellow cyclists. And while it feels great to be told by total strangers that your bike looks cool, it just goes to show how visible you are.

No means of exaggeration, I feel like I am riding a glowing dragon. It’s that much fun.

Happy (& safe & well-lit) riding!

About the author

Emma started commuting by bike in February of this year and loves it. She always stops at red lights, and wears a helmet. She works in communications at a national arts organization and adores Toronto.

You can learn more about this snazzy individual at about.me/emmajenkin or follow her on twitter at @indeedemma

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How-To: TRON-ify your bike

NOTE: This is a guest post by Emma Jenkin, who like most of us, craves a TRON LightBike, and set out to make an affordable one!   Learn more about Emma at the bottom of this post.

Yes, all you need legally for your bike is a white light up front and a red rear light. I know when I’m biking at night I can hardly see other cyclists with just those lights, so I can’t be all that visible either.

There are a bunch of options out there to light up your bike a bit more. There’s Bike Glow (+$40 after shipping), LED by Lite ($100-$150) Fibre Flare (as yet unavailable in Canada) and the awe-inspiring Monkey Electric wheel lights ($70 and up).

Now I admit I didn’t start biking for the environment, and I didn’t do it for the exercise. Those are bonuses. I did it to save money. And I figured there must be a way to brighten up my bike on the cheap.

You will need:

 

  • Submersible LEDs

 

I got mine at 100 Candles – a ten pack runs you about $12 and comes with extra batteries. Shipping to Toronto was $16. I’m sure any number of LEDs will work, but the on/off needs to be on the bottom of the fixture. The ones from 100 Candles twist on/off.

 

 

  • Tubing

 

I bought Reinforced Braided Vinyl Tube in 5/8” from Canadian Tire – the diameter must be as close to the width of your LED as possible as the light has to fit tightly in there. The 5/8” tubing I got was pretty much perfect. At about $4 a yard, I managed to make three lights out of it.

  • Utility knife
  • Zip ties or metal clamps

 

 

Steps:

  1. Cut the tubing to the length you want, making sure there is space at the each end when you attach it to your bike so you can fit your in there to turn the light on/off.
  2. Carefully carve the inside edge of the end of the tube so that the LED fits tightly. You don’t want it falling out. Make sure you can still turn your LED on/off. Mine stick out enough from the tubing to allow for this.

Carving the inside edge. Go a little bit at a time. You don’t want it to be loose around your light.

The LED in the tube. The bottom half of the light is outside the tube because it needs to twist to turn on.

 

Testing the light

 

3. Repeat the process for the other end of the tube.

4. Strap your new light to your bike frame.

 

5. Bike!

 

Yayyy Emma.

It looks really cool. :)

 

 

About the inventor author

Emma started commuting by bike in February of this year and loves it. She always stops at red lights, and wears a helmet (apart from in these pictures). She works in communications at a national arts organization and adores Toronto.

You can learn more about this snazzy individual at about.me/emmajenkin or follow her on twitter at @indeedemma

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On The Blogs: How To Light Your Bike

The Night RiderExcellent and timely lighting post from Stephen on Cycling50+ … a great rundown of the lights and reflectors you need to ensure drivers see you at night:

Last week’s clock rewind is yet another dead giveaway that winter approaches. And it’s turned many bike commuters into night riders

The basic trick to night riding is to see and be seen. Even on well-lit streets, darkness not only makes it more difficult to see, but also judge distances and direction, which means slower reaction times – for both drivers and riders.

Read the full post at Cycling50+

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