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Jarvis bike lane latest in City Hall’s symbolic struggles

Down at City Hall, they chase gravy trains and fight a war on (or for) the car—and show respect for certain areas of the city by promising their residents underground transit. At some point, it seems that politics in Toronto passed into the realm of almost pure symbolism. This is especially true in the case of the Jarvis Street bike lanes.

At a time when the world’s other major cities—New York, Chicago, Copenhagen, London—are rapidly installing pedestrian and cycling infrastructure and discouraging car travel, Rob Ford’s Toronto is instead removing a major bike route before the painted lines on the road have even had a chance to dry.

Read the full post: “The Jarvis bike lane is just the latest in City Hall’s symbolic struggles” on The GridTO .

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Opinion on Jarvis: We Let Our Emotions Get the Better of Us

Interesting viewpoint from the Toronto Standard on the whole Jarvis thing:

People are, of course, entitled to have an emotional response to political issues, and, in many ways, such a response is natural and to be expected. But by allowing emotional responses to dictate the nature of our political discourse, we create a false dichotomy between groups of people. Since its inception as a political issue, the Jarvis bike lane removal has been, almost exclusively, positioned as a debate between cyclists and drivers. In reality, however, the configuration of one of Toronto major arteries is something that affects all of us. After all, roads are the means by which all modes of transportation traverse a city — that is, pedestrians, public transit, cyclists, and, yes, cars all need access to roads to get anywhere. However, when someone claims that a mother’s commute became significantly longer due to a recently installed bike lane, or when someone sits down on a road to protest the removal of a bike lane, what they are doing, in effect, is asserting that their claim to a major road is somehow more legitimate than everyone else’s.

Read the full post: “Jarvis Bike Lane Debacle We Let Our Emotions Get the Better of Us” on Toronto Standard .

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Parking meters appear on Jarvis – to honour city councillors?

We need the fifth lane of parking traffic to keep Toronto moving. To keep Toronto’s economy going and Toronto’s moms with their kids for longer times, rather than stuck in parking traffic. The desperate need for this fifth lane of parking traffic has made us internationally famous. Toronto is on the map, and it’s moving again.

Perhaps the parking meters will somehow help the fifth lane move even faster. We don’t know, we’re not traffic engineers, we just don’t want moms blocked by parking traffic.

Read the full post: “Parking meters appear on Jarvis — an opportunity to honour courageous city councillors” on Spacing Toronto .

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Protestor and local physician arrested on Jarvis bike lane

“As a family and public health physician, I’m very concerned about the safety, the lack of public consultation and the misuse of taxpayer money,” Svoboda explained. “This is the only major North American city that is removing bicycle lanes. There’s going to be a net loss of one bicycle lane this year. And that’s a national disgrace.”

Read the full post: “Protestor arrested on Jarvis bike lane” at NOW Magazine.

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Jarvis Street Should Be Safe for Everyone

Very interesting post on Torontoist by Steve Fisher, the first person to sit down in front of the bikelane removal trucks on Monday:

When I left the Jarvis Taskforce‘s emergency meeting this past weekend, I was fairly convinced that I wanted to protest the removal of the Jarvis Street bike lane in some way. It wasn’t until yesterday afternoon, though, when I heard the scrub truck power-washing the lane away through my window, that I realized I was going to take the drastic action of sitting in the street to halt its progress.

Read the full post: “Jarvis Street Should Be Safe for Everyone” on Torontoist .

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