Learn more about BikingToronto and Singer Kwinter

INFRASTRUCTURE: After waiting a decade, cyclists are taking new bike lanes in style

PJT-CyclingLanes-5.jpg

This was a pretty benign article about the 10 years (10 YEARS) it took to get PILOT approval of separated bikelanes on Richmond and Adelaide, until I got to the line I’ve bolded at the bottom of this post.  Egan, you WILL need the flexi-posts, because cars do NOT stay out of bikelanes.  You of all people should know this.

Also… 10 years is CRAZY.  How long did it build to take the SkyDome?  3 years.  The CN Tower? 3 years.  The Burj Khalifa, the tallest man-made structure in the world at 830m tall? 6 years.  Two 1.5 kilometre pilot bikelanes in Toronto? 10 years.

Daniel Egan, manager of cycling infrastructure, said his staff have done travel time surveys, driving Richmond and Adelaide before the bike paths went in; they will drive the stretches again this fall to compare results. The city will also count cars and bikes, and report back to council in 2015.“It could be anything from ‘Yeah, it’s great,’ to ‘take it out,’ ” he says.The staff report promises lanes “separated from adjacent traffic lane by a painted buffer and flexi-posts.” Laura Pedersen/National PostBicyclists use the newly painted bike lanes on eastbound Adelaide Street West between Bathurst Street and Spadina Avenue in Toronto, Ontario on Thursday, July 24, 2014.

Mr. Egan said if cars stay out of the bike lanes, they may not need the flexi-posts.

Read More: After waiting more than a decade, cyclists are taking to the new bike lanes in style | National Post.

(the National Post is annoying, and puts up a paywall.  Just google “incognito browsing” for your browser to open the link that way.)

comments powered by Disqus

INFRASTRUCTURE: The thrills of Toronto’s new Sunnyside Bike Park

sunnyside_bike

Toronto’s first large-scale, city-sanctioned bike park has opened between High Park and Lake Ontario. Sunnyside Bike Park is the first major effort to bring those who would fly through the air on bikes out of the city’s ravines and into the mainstream; there’s reason to think it won’t be the last.A narrow strip of land east of Ellis Avenue between the Gardiner Expressway and Lake Shore Boulevard West is now packed with both aerial and ground-based features for beginners to expert riders: serpentine pump tracks, bermed corners, ramps, log “skinnies,” a wall ride and plenty of tabletop and gap jumps.

Read More: The thrills of Toronto’s new Sunnyside Bike Park: ‘You have a couple of spills, but it’s worth it’ – The Globe and Mail.

comments powered by Disqus

14 Reasons Why Every Bike Lane Needs To Be A Protected Bike Lane

What’s a physically protected bike lane?  It’s one that trucks and buses and giant SUVs and obnoxious sports cars driven by men with self-image problems can’t drive or park in.

They look like this, with some variations:

lane

rthDYjtNbssRZLC-556x313-noPad

And here are reasons why EVERY bikelane in Toronto needs to be a protected bikelane.  SPOILER alert: bikelanes are big giant #FAILS and giant wastes of money if cars can park in them.

 

1. This TTC Bus on Simcoe

ttcbus-simcoe

Photo by Harris Silver

 

2. This postal van and buses in the Bay Street bikelane (which you can’t even SEE!)

baytrucks

Photo by Marcel Smazal

 

3. These cars working together on Simcoe

simcoe-cooperation

Photo by Leah Hollinsworth

 

4. This Brinks truck in the brand new short Bay bikelane

brinks-bay

Photo by Scun Yun

 

5. This colourblind driver in the Sherbourne bikelane

sherbourne-colour

Photo from My Bikelane Toronto

 

6. This Tim Hortons Food Truck on Simcoe

timhortons-bikelane

Photo from My Bikelane Toronto

 

7. This Beer Store truck that blocks the Gerrard lane EVERY Tuesday morning

beerstore-gerrard

Photo from My Bikelane Toronto

 

8. This car congo line on Simcoe

simcoe-conga

Photo from My Bikelane Toronto

 

9. This Coke truck on College

coke-college

Photo from My Bikelane Toronto

 

10. These UPS trucks on College

ups-college

Photo from My Bikelane Toronto

 

11. This genius on Shaw.  

shaw-lazy

If only there was legal parking somewhere nearby…

Photo from My Bikelane Toronto

 

12. These cops in a car getting coffee

police-college

Photo from My Bikelane Toronto

 

13. These dudes on Sherbourne eating Burritos

Sherbourne-burritos

Sherbourne (at least the south portion of it) is NOT a separated bikelane. Putting a gutter and a green line doesn’t make it separated.  Stop calling it one.

Photo from My Bikelane Toronto

 

And of course…

14. This Canada Post driver, who parked on St. George and then told person who documented it to “go f–k yourself

canadapost

Photo from My Bikelane Toronto

See post and video here.

 

Driver behaviour WILL NOT CHANGE.   They’ll park wherever they can fit their car or truck.  It’s better just to prevent them from getting in the bikelane in the first place.

Let’s try and make an actual EFFORT at making Toronto bike-friendly, okay?

comments powered by Disqus

OH YEAH! Bike Share Toronto Hackathon & Design Jam

logo

Very cool!  Bikeshare Toronto… I think I love you.  Great innovative event.

Save the date – we’re hacking Bike Share Toronto!

On August 15th, 16th and 17th, we’ll be holding a hackathon, design jam and various community events to see what kinds of apps, maps, stories and visualizations we can create using Bike Share Toronto data and other cycling and planning data.

 Bike Share TO is releasing its open data sets for the first time ever – and we’re inviting you to dig in first. (Don’t worry – we’ve already cleaned it up). The Toronto Open Data portal has other data sets of note/interest to consider, including bicycle parking, bike trails and others. To get an idea of the data used and entries created, check out this event from the Bay Area Data Challenge: http://www.bayareabikeshare.com/datachallenge

via Bike Share Toronto Hackathon & Design Jam | #hackbikeshareTO.

comments powered by Disqus

INFRASTRUCTURE: Why College Street is Toronto cyclists’ ‘dooring zone’

Why is College a dooring zone? Because they painted the bikelane right beside parked cars.   Maybe it’s time to (and I’m just brainstorming out of the box here) move the bikelane from right beside the parked cars and put it next to the streetcar tracks, with flex-bollards on each side, making it a protected (from streetcars and cars) bikelane?

Of the 1,308 Toronto cyclists hit by opening car doors between 2005 and 2013, most were hurt but only one was killed: A 57-year-old man biking east on Eglinton Avenue West on a May afternoon in 2008 when a 43-year-old woman opened her car door and sent the man flying into traffic, where he was hit by a truck. He died in hospital.

The woman was charged with “Open Vehicle Door Improperly” – the same charge applied, in theory, to any driver careless or callous or harried or busy enough to open a car door on a cyclist.

Read More: INTERACTIVE: Why College Street is Toronto cyclists’ ‘dooring zone’ – Toronto | Globalnews.ca.

comments powered by Disqus






Popular Posts This Week