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VIDEO: See Cyclist. Think Horse.

Pretty humourous video from Scotland about giving cyclists space on the roads.  You can bet drivers give horses a lot of space here in Toronto (probably because they always have cops riding them).

via: Cycling Scotland : See cyclist. Think Horse. [Commercial 2013] – YouTube.

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ELSEWHERE: Brooklyn Whole Foods to deliver by cargo bike

We already know that many US families are embracing the cargo bike for car-free transportation. Perhaps even more exciting is the fact that businesses are getting in on the act too.

Instead of using vans to run their delivery scheme, the Whole Foods store on Third & 3rd in Brooklyn—which already features impressive sustainability credentials including climate-friendly refrigeration, solar arrays and wind turbines, and a rooftop farm—has partnered with cargo bike specialists People’s Cargo to develop custom-built, electric assist delivery bikes complete with cooler and solar panel for recharging.

Read More: Brooklyn Whole Foods to deliver by cargo bike : TreeHugger.

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ELSEWHERE: Allo Velo – It Takes a Village to Build a Bike Shop

Lamar Timmins of Allo Velo - Chris Bruntlett

Wonderful article about Allo Velo and Velolifestyle, and I’m not just saying that because they are a new sponsor of Biking Toronto.  I lvoe the part about kids coming by after school to fill up their tires.

To say the community has been supportive of his venture would be an understatement. “This used to be a massage parlor, and not the kind you’d send your mom to,” Timmins explained. “There’s an elderly couple who walk by every day on their way to Atwater Market, and they make a point of knocking on the window and waving.” At the end of each school day, local kids will drop by to fill up their tires, or to lift or lower their saddles if they’ve been sharing their bike with a sibling. “We’ve met so many great families who love the variety of cargo bikes we rent and sell, and that has really affirmed our commitment to spread the word about them.”

Read More: Allo Velo – It Takes a Village to Build a Bike Shop – Momentum Mag.

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ELSEWHERE: How to inspire millions more Americans to ride bicycles

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You can see big changes happening across America as communities from Fairbanks to St. Petersburg transform their streets into appealing places for people, not just cars and trucks.

“Over the past five years we’re seeing an infrastructure revolution, a rethinking of our streets to accommodate more users — busways, public plazas, space for pedestrians and, of course, bike lanes,” says David Vega-Barachowitz of the National Association of City Transportation Officials. “More protected bike lanes is one of the most important parts of this.”

Read More: How to inspire millions more Americans to ride bicycles | PeopleForBikes

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ELSEWHERE: Seeing business benefits, retailers propose protected bike lanes in Portland

Ah, Portland. The entire continent has a heart-on for you.

Everyone who pays attention knows that bikes (and bikelanes) are good for business (even in Toronto, with studies in the Annex and the Bloor West Village).. and even businesses know it in Portland, PROPOSING protected bikelanes themselves.

Not the city, not cycling advocates… the retailers themselves are pushing for protected bikelanes.

A coalition of 30 Old Town bars, restaurants and entertainment venues is proposing adding a quarter-mile of planter-protected bike lanes and street cafe seating to 2nd and/or 3rd avenues.

Inspired by nearby projects on SW Ankeny and NE Multnomah, the six-month-old Old Town Hospitality Group sees their experimental road diet concept, which could narrow the streets’ car-oriented area from three travel lanes to one or two and might remove some on-street auto parking, as a way to make the neighborhood safer, more comfortable and better to do business in.

Full article: Seeing business upsides, Old Town retailers propose protected bike lanes on 2nd, 3rd – BikePortland.org.

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