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Reminder: Group Commute Pancake Breakfast is on Monday

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Just a reminder in case you don’t know… the Annual Group Commute to a Free Pancake Breakfast at City Hall runs on Monday morning (May 30th).  Groups of cyclists meet at set points around the city (list and map below) and bike downtown – all meeting up at City Hall… where the City gives us pancakes and coffee and stuff. Michael Holloway also blogged about this on his FreeWheel blog.

This doesn’t really help people that bike to work in other parts of the city, but good nonetheless.

Here are complete details, courtesy of the City of Toronto site, and a complete list of BikeMonth events are on the City’s calendar, and BikingToronto has a BikeMonth section too to help expand the good work of city staff – complete with Facebook, Twitter, Flickr and RSS feed resources.:

The Group Commute was the event that started it all. Bike Month began as bike to work day, and the annual Group Commute and free pancake breakfast remains the marquee event of Bike Month.

The ride leaves from various start locations at 7:00am and meets at Yonge and Bloor for 7:30am. From there the ride heads to Nathan Phillips Square for 8:00am to enjoy a complimentary pancake breakfast and other festivities.

The interactive map below shows the Community Start Locations and routes.

 


See larger interactive map

Can’t see the interactive map? Download a map of the major City start points.

List of Start Points to join the ride

City Start Point

Community Start Point

Humber River Waterfront trail bridge 6:30 a.m.

Bloor and High Park 7:00 a.m.

Wilson Ave and Avenue Rd. (at the Cricket Club) 7 a.m.

Yonge and Lawrence 7:00 a.m.

Don Mills and Lawrence 7:00 a.m.

Danforth and Woodbine 7:00 a.m.

Wynchwood Barns 7:15 a.m.

Bloor and Yonge 7:30 a.m.

Bloor and Brunswick 7:20 a.m.

Danforth and Chester 7:20 a.m.

Kew Gardens 7:30 a.m.

Dundas East and Kingston Rd. 7:30 a.m.

 

Group Commute, 2010

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The Bixi Toronto Press Release – Full Text

Here is the full text of the City of Toronto press release about the May 3, 2011 Launch of Bixi Toronto.  If you’d like to download the PDF for yourself, you can find it on Google Docs here.

March 15, 2011

BIXI Toronto set to launch on May 3

The City of Toronto and the Public Bike System Company are proud to announce that the official launch of the BIXI Toronto program will take place on May 3 with 1,000 bikes, 80 BIXI stations and 1,500 docking points in Toronto’s downtown core. City Council approved the BIXI Toronto program last May.

“The BIXI Toronto program is an exciting new cycling initiative that will encourage more bicycle trips in the downtown core. It is also a great example of public-private partnership to benefit Toronto residents and visitors,” said Councillor Denzil Minnan-Wong (Ward 34 Don Valley East), Chair of the City’s Public Works and Infrastructure Committee.

The Public Bike System Company (PBSC) is the organization behind the concept, development and operation of award-winning BIXI – which operates bike-sharing systems on three continents and is the first large-scale bike sharing system in North America.

“We are happy to count Toronto among the three Canadian cities where the BIXI service will be available in 2011,” said Roger Plamondon, Chairman of the PBSC board. “More than 1,200 Torontonians purchased an annual membership last fall, five months before the program’s launch. We are convinced that Torontonians will quickly adopt the BIXI bikes as a convenient and economical way to get around.”

Designed to complement public transit, the BIXI bikes are intended to be used for one-way trips of less than 30 minutes. BIXI bikes can be picked up or dropped off at any of the 80 downtown bicycle docking stations 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Regular users of the system will purchase a pass for periods of time ranging from one month to one year and will receive a BIXI key. Members can use their BIXI key to take out a bike at any station in the network. Non-members can purchase a 24-hour pass. There is no trip fee if the bicycle is returned to a bike station within 30 minutes. A fee is charged for any trip longer than 30 minutes.

More information about the program is available at http://toronto.bixi.com.

Media contacts:
Steve Johnston, Senior Communications Coordinator, City of Toronto, 416-392-4391,
sjohnsto@toronto.ca
Bérengère Thériault, Public Bike System Company, cell 514-497-9380
btheriault@publicbikesystem.com

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Tonight’s Sharrow meeting CANCELLED

Urgent Message from the City of Toronto

Because of an error discovered in the Rush-Hour Sharrow Evaluation data analysis, tonight’s public meeting has been CANCELLED.

The City of Toronto does not wish to misrepresent the data collected as part of this project, and so the data collected must be re-evaluated in full before any findings may be presented publicly.

THERE WILL BE NO MEETING TONIGHT: Thursday January 20th, 2011

We apologise for any inconvenience to those who had planned to attend tonight’s meeting.

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City of Toronto releases Bicycle Count Statistics

Counting BikesIn September 2010, the City of Toronto conducted the first ever count of cyclists heading into (and out of) the downtown core.  To measure these numbers, they established 4 “screenlines” along Spadina, Bloor, Jarvis and Queens Quay and counted cyclists entering and exiting the downtown zone between 7 am and 7 pm on days without rain.

They’ve released their numbers, and they are impressive:

  • Between the hours of 7:00 AM and 7:00 PM on a typical weekday in September 2010, 19,162 cyclists entered Toronto’s downtown core, and 15,241 exited the core.
  • The western screenline at Spadina Avenue had the highest bicycle volumes, carrying 45% of all cyclists travelling to and from the core.
  • The majority (62%) of cyclists were male, wore a helmet (54%), and rode on the street rather than on the sidewalk (95%). Very few (0.32%) of counted cyclists were passengers (e.g. in a child seat or trailer).

This is a great release of information and if the City can continue to undertake these cyclist counting initiatives, it can address anti-bike infrastructure sentiment with cold, hard, statistical facts.

Between the hours of 7:00 AM and
7:00 PM on a typical weekday in September
2010, 19,162 cyclists entered Toronto’s
downtown core, and 15,241exited the core.
The western screenline at Spadina
Avenue had the highest bicycle volumes,
carrying 45% of all cyclists travelling to and
from the core.
The majority (62%) of cyclists were
male, wore a helmet (54%), and rode on the
street rather than on the sidewalk (95%).
Very few (0.32%) of counted cyclists were
passengers (e.g. in a child seat or trailer).
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Help the City of Toronto plan the 2011 Bike Map

The City of Toronto has posted a survey online to get your feedback about the Toronto Cycling Map:

The City of Toronto is conducting this survey to learn about how people are using the Map, what works, and what could be improved.

Every year the City publishes and distributes 150,000 Cycling Maps free of charge.

Go by the site and leave your feedback.

Unfortunately it doesn’t ask for features that people would like added to the map, but only how often existing features are used currently.  Having said that, the map is extremely useful.  I always have one in the bottom of my panniers (yes, one in each) so that I can consult it if need be.

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