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Lack of Bike Parking on Yonge means bikes hurting newly planted trees

Here’s an idea – provide more bike parking – then people wouldn’t be forced to lock to trees.  Yes, there are bike posts on Yonge south of College, but they are often filled up.

The damage wasn’t as bad as the reader said, but a lot of bark on the trunks of some trees had been rubbed away, making them more susceptible to the ravages of weather and road salt, which often kills sidewalk trees.

There’s a big bicycle rack just up the street and other locking posts nearby, but many cyclists prefer to lock their bikes to the trees and conveniently overlook the damage it does.

Full article: Bikes rub newly planted trees the wrong way on Yonge St.: The Fixer | Toronto Star.

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New on Richmond: Stone Canoe Bike Rack

stonecanoe

Awesome video about the new canoe-shaped bikerack on Richmond St.:

Stone Canoe commissioned a half-ton piece of artwork geared to give cyclists in the area a beautiful place to park their bicycles. The bike rack, reminiscent of a stone canoe, has been installed on the northwest corner of Walnut Ave. and Richmond St. West. The Toronto Stone Canoe team worked closely with Montreal jewellery designer, Pilar Agueci (pilaragueci.com), and Montreal metalsmith, Jacques Gallant (solutionsgallant.com), who designed and built the rack. It serves as a functional roadside attraction, and an indication of the boutique advertising agency’s commitment to creativity, and standing out.

via Stone Canoe Bike Rack.

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The News Cycle for Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2011

 

Advertising good, bikes bad [Dodgeville]

Enough has been written about these stupid info pillars elsewhere that I won’t bore you with another diatribe against their design or the questionable process that resulted in the city being saddled with them in the first place. This one is in front of Carrot Common on Danforth and in addition to looking ugly, replaced a perfectly good post and ring bike rack, as seen by Google Street View.

 

Toronto-Montreal Bixi comparison [Globe & Mail]

Excellent Infographic from the Globe and Mail comparing the first year of Montreal’s Bixi bikesharing program with the first 6 months of Toronto’s Bixi.  Toronto’s numbers are obviously lower due to the shortened time period, but are EXCELLENT considering we have one-fifth of Montreal’s Bixi bikes (1000 and 5000 bikes, respectively).

 

Trashy Bike Lane [The Urban Country]

To see how a bike lane might work on this street we gathered garbage and sticks and created a homemade bike lane. The painted bicycle symbols (or “sharrows”) were painted by an anonymous group/person shortly after Jenna’s death.  We observed how cars and trucks drove with our “trash” bike lane present. Drivers seemed to stay clear of our faux bike lane when they drove through the intersection, including a large tractor-trailer whose rear wheels stayed clear of our bike lane.

 

Create annotated bike rides with Spotcycle mobile app [BlogTO]

The most recent update to the app, however, ups the ante significantly. Now instead of merely using it to track down BIXI bikes, you can plot out annotated bike rides with your favourite cultural sites, restaurants and assorted retail. Where Spotcycle was formerly only useful to BIXI members, this new feature set opens up the app to anyone who rides a bike. Using the the GPS capabilities of one’s phone — it’s available on all three of the major platforms — the app will create a live map as you ride, which you can categorize and annotate when you’re done.

 

 

[photo from Dodgeville]

About the News Cycle

The News Cycle is a periodic post which brings together links to news, events and other things which may be of interest to Toronto’s cyclists.  If you have an item you would like to see in The News Cycle, please email it to me at joe[at]bikingtoronto.com

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New Bike Corral on Spadina

Duncan broke the story (and had a photo) yesterday of the new bike parking corral on Spadina yesterday, even beating out the Toronto Cyclists Union and Spacing Magazine, who were instrumental in getting the new parking put in (their offices are in the adjacent building – 215 Spadina):

This new installation has created 16 much needed parking spaces in the same area that previously hosted 2 cars.  Protected by bright bollards, cyclists now have a safe new place to lock their two-wheelers.

The rack is also a unique design. (Not exactly unique… this rack design is also found in the new St. Clair West TTC station bike shelter – Joe) The front wheel is wedged between two metal brackets that form an ‘anchor’ of sorts for each spot.  The anchor spots, 8 in each of the two new racks, alternate with one near the ground, next to one that is raised in a ‘one up/one down’ pattern that allows bikes to fit better side by side.

City staff say that if this seasonal bike parking pilot proves successful, they will consider installing it in other high bike traffic areas as of next Spring.

- Toronto Cyclists Union

from Duncans City Ride

from Duncan's City Ride

from Spacing

from Spacing

from Spacing

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The New Ryerson Student Centre to have Bicycle Only Parking

The new Ryerson student centre (rendering above) will be replacing and/or enhancing the old Sam the Record Man building at Yonge & Gould is planned to have bicycle only parking, according to a recent article in the Star:

The single most dramatic gesture would be to close Gould St. between Yonge and Church Sts. That would help make Ryerson a truly pedestrian precinct, and provide the means to establish a genuine campus, one that belongs to students.

“I think closing Gould will lead the process,” says Ryerson president and CEO Sheldon Levy. “We can’t be passive to the city-building aspect of the plan.”

He also admits proposals he once worried would be viewed as “radical” are now seen as “moderate.”

The appetite for change is growing; suddenly ideas like closing Gould, tearing down Kerr Hall, and turning the recently purchased Sam The Record Man site into a student centre with bicycle-only parking make eminent sense.

Indeed, we are starting to grasp that old ways of doing things – handing over cities to cars and building hideous schools – are irrational and destructive.

Along with a pedestrian/cyclist-friendly Master Plan under way (including making part of Gould St. closed to cars), Ryerson is on its way to becoming BikeU for Toronto. Let’s hope this will inspire the other downtown institute of higher learning, UofT (to plan for people and make some pedestrian boulevardes out of city streets) and maybe even YorkU, up there on the edge of the city (but in the heart of suburbia).

If you’re wondering about Sam’s giant iconic spinning record signs (which have been granted heritage status by the city), the new building is supposed to incorporate them, making them an indoor feature.

They’d look pretty cool as the spinning wheels of a giant bike…

Rendering courtesy of Torontoist.

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