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GET INVOLVED: Help Cycle Toronto with a Social Media Member Drive

We need your help! This month, we’re running March Membership Magic. Everyone who joins Cycle Toronto or renews their membership this month gets entered into a draw for a bike from Giant Toronto

To get the word out about the promo, I’m looking to get one tweet or Facebook post (or both!) every half hour on Tuesday, March 11. This is a method that a lot of organizations have been using lately to create virality, and it’s something we think it would be awesome to try. 

Please check out this Google doc to sign up for a timeslot, and to see some options for what you might say to your followers/friends:

This could be huge! With your help, we can make March our biggest membership month yet. As you know, we’re aiming for 3000 members by the end of 2014, and this is going to be a major part of getting there. The more members we have, the stronger our voice, and the better we can work to make this a better bike city.

 

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Write the Public Works Committee about electric scooters in bike lanes.

E-bike riders seek equality with pedal-pushing counterparts

CycleToronto has a great rundown of what the city’s proposal to allow “e-bikes” in bikelanes will mean for Toronto’s cyclists.  Be sure and click through and send an email to the Public Works Committee about why this is a misguided proposal.

This Thursday, members of Public Works & Infrastructure Committee will consider a set of recommendations to change the rules around where e-bikes are permitted in Toronto.

We’re supportive of e-bikes as an alternative to larger, less environmentally friendly motor vehicles, especially for people with impaired mobility.

We welcome Recommendation 1 to allow power-assisted bicycles which weigh less than 40kg and require pedaling for propulsion (“pedelecs”) in multi-use trails, cycle tracks and bicycle lanes.

But we’re concerned about Recommendation 2, which would allow electric scooters in all painted bicycle lanes across the City.

We support the MTO and Transport Canada addressing Recommendation 4, to split the existing power-assisted bicycles vehicle category into e-scooter and pedelec type vehicles, before the City considers the recommendation to allow them to drive in bicycle lanes.

Email details and more info: Electric scooters in bike lanes? Write Public Works now! | Cycle Toronto.

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D.C. Program to help female cyclists, others learn how to handle street harassment

This is fantastic and needed EVERYWHERE.  Can we bring something like this to Toronto?  I’ll help.

Recently, the Washington Area Bicyclist Association partnered with Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS) in the District to give cyclists a safe place to vent and discuss harassment prevention and empowerment strategies, said Nelle Pierson, WABA’s coordinator of outreach programs.

“A lot of women start biking because it is empowering, but also because they can just get away from a situation,” said Zosia Sztykowski, 28, of Columbia Heights, the lead outreach coordinator for CASS, a grassroots organization dedicated to building awareness and ending sexual assault and harassment on the streets. The organization produces a blog that curates women’s experiences with street harassment. “A lot of people think street harassment happens just to them and that they’re alone,” she said.

via D.C. groups help female cyclists, others learn how to handle street harassment – The Washington Post.

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How To Hold Drivers Accountable

cyclist

A fantastic article about two very different philosophies when someone is is killed on a bicycle.

The driver who hit Burgess Hu never saw him.

She was making a right turn, and the police assume she was looking left. In other words, she wasn’t looking where she was going.

As he biked into the driveway of Excelsior Middle School in Byron, California, 12-year-old Burgess was knocked down and dragged some 60 feet before the driver came to a stop. He never made it to school that day. Instead, as the school day began, Burgess lay dead under the wheels of the black GMC Yukon.

In this country, “I didn’t see the cyclist” is the negligent driver’s universal get-out-of-jail free card. It shouldn’t be. If you say you were driving and didn’t see somebody, it’s almost always because you weren’t paying attention. Maybe you were reaching for something in the front seat, or maybe even the back seat. Maybe you were daydreaming. And then suddenly, there’s a cyclist who “came out of nowhere,” smashing into your car.

This is a MUST READ.  Please click through below.

Full article:  There’s Another Way | Road Rights | Bicycling.com.

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Cycle Toronto responds to the Rosie DiManno “Cyclists Should Be Shot” Article

Good on Cycle Toronto.  Read their response to Rosie DiManno’s “Cyclsts Should Be Shot” article (and probably the Star’s Public Editor Response calling it “a joke”)

Cycle Toronto believes that road safety is a serious issue and one that must be discussed in a mature and respectful manner. We advocate for safer streets so that people who choose to ride a bike can do so without risking their lives. However, in 2011 there were 2,275 car-pedestrian collisions, 1,315 car-bike collisions and zero bike-pedestrian collisions reported to Toronto Police.

We reject Rosie’s metaphors of war and her derisive attitude. It is never okay to joke about shooting people. We invite Rosie to contact Cycle Toronto if she is interested in engaging in a meaningful and constructive dialogue about how to make our streets safer for us all.

Full Response: Don’t shoot me, I’m only the cyclist | Toronto Star.

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