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INFRASTRUCTURE: Can I Take My Bicycle on the TTC?

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Kudos to Scott Kobewka (@CivicImages on twitter), who made a cool website that answers one question quickly and easily. Can I Take My Bicycle on the TTC?.

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Ride Your Bike: TTC hikes fares, again

You should consider winter biking – it’s fun, pretty easy, and warm if you dress properly for it.  Don’t give the TTC more of your money for the “service” they provide.  Check the “Weather” section of our How-To Page to learn more!

It will cost Metropass users $60 a year, or $5 a month, more to ride the TTC next year.

The Toronto Transit Commission has approved a base five-cent increase to the cost of a token, bringing it to $2.70. In addition the cost of an adult Metropass is being boosted by one trip — from 48.5 tokens to 49.5.

The Metropass increase to $133.75 a month — with commensurate adjustments to the student and senior passes — was chosen over the option of increasing the $3 cash fare by 25 cents. Instead, the cash fare will rise by only a nickel, to $3.05.

Full Story: TTC hikes token cost by nickel; Metropass goes to $133.75 a month | Metro.

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Subway Closure? More Bikes!

This is a good post to share with your friends who don’t bike (yet).

We had better gear up for lots of new cyclists on the road this October… the TTC is shutting down the subway for 9 (!) consecutive days to upgrade the signal system.

Badly needed upgrades will grind subway service to a halt in the heart of downtown for nine consecutive days in October, an unprecedented closure that stands to affect hundreds of thousands of commuters.

While the TTC replaces the outdated, increasingly unreliable signalling system that caused a major disruption this week, there will be no service on the Yonge-University-Spadina line between Osgoode and King stations, from Oct. 12 to 20.

The entire downtown “U,” from St. George to Bloor stations, will be closed during the two weekends that bookend the nine-day period, the first of which is Thanksgiving weekend.

Full story: TTC plans unprecedented subway closure | Toronto Star.

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Streetcar tracks blamed for a third of bicycling injuries

 

Streetcar tracks may be a factor in almost a third of all bicycle crashes in Toronto, new research suggests.

Of 276 Toronto cyclists interviewed, 90 reported that streetcar tracks were directly involved in their crashes, says Kay Teschke, a professor in the University of British Columbia’s School of Population and Public Health.

About half of those track-related crashes occurred when a bike tire got caught, according to Teschke, while the rest happened when bike tires slipped on the tracks.

Read the full post: “Streetcar tracks blamed for a third of bicycling injuries” on The Star.

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Does TTC Environmental Assessment for Lakeshore Facility ignore Cyclists?

Martin Goodman Trail, looking west towards LeslieThe TTC is planning on building a substantial “Barns” facility on the southeast corner of Leslie St. and Lake Shore Blvd., and has just completed an Environmental Assessment.

Paul Young of the South Riverdale Community Health Centre has sent along his review of the EA:

As you may know SET BUG and Bike Sauce have been attending meetings and voicing concerns about safety for cyclists and primarily pedestrians. The shopping concentration is a destination for every day needs. It is also a gateway to the Leslie Spit and the Lakeshore multi-use trail. My understanding is many people walk or bike to this area to shop and recreate and many commuters travel through it by car.

I skimmed through the Transportation study and noted:

  • “traffic” does not include pedestrians or cyclists
  • No mention of cycling facilities in the immediate area (Eastern, Lakeshore and Martin Goodman)
  • % of people biking or walking to work is assumed to be 3% (transit 17% and Cars 80%) pg. 8 traffic study
  • No traffic counts done on weekend (I may have missed them)
  • All “mitigation measures” are addressing car traffic
  • No evidence of re-routing heavy trucks
  • I couldn’t see anything on the status of parking (may have missed it)
  • No evidence of pedestrian or bicycle analysis (of circulation or volumes) at all.

I skimmed the Environmental Project Report Volume 1 and found

  • No evidence that Toronto Transportation (cycling or otherwise) was engaged in the process
  • Loads of comments regarding walking and safety issues on Leslie (among other things).

Please take a moment to have a look and compile any thoughts.   Send them along and we can think about how to bundle them up and send them in.

Also, the TTC has dropped of a copy of these reports at various locations including the Jones Library, Beaches Library and here at the Health Centre. Let me know if you want to borrow copy for a day or so.

Also, a small group of residents SET BUG and Bike Sauce people will be meeting with the TTC in the second week of October. Please pass along any ideas and let me know if you would like to be included in any correspondence.

Thanks, Paul

What do you think?  I’m rather surprised that bike-related stuff seems to be ignored… the Martin-Goodman Trail and the connecting path to the Leslie Street Spit are quite busy routes for cyclists AND pedestrians (not to mention rollerbladers).

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