Learn more about BikingToronto and Singer Kwinter

OH YEAH! Is Bicycling a Form of Preventive Health Care?

Recent studies continue to shed light on how everyday cycling is not only good for our cardiovascular health but also a way to save billions in health care costs. While everyday cycling is starting to be recognized as a low-impact form of exercise there remains resistance to accepting riding a bike as a form of preventive health care across North America.

Clearly, biking is advantageous for one’s physical health. It’s widely known that cycling is a low-impact form of exercise that’s good for the cardiovascular system, a way to control weight gain, and benefits our immune system. In addition, daily bicycling can have positive effects on our mental well-being.

Full Article: Is Bicycling a Form of Preventive Health Care? – Momentum Mag.

Related Posts:
  • No related posts found
comments powered by Disqus

TOURISM: Sightseeing by pedal power: Toronto (doesn’t) tout cycle tourism options

This article is basically an ad for Toronto Bicycle Tours… but more interesting is that it is NOT about Toronto touting cycle tourism options but that we are failing… that cycle tourism is big business and Toronto is letting it slip away by ignoring cycling infrastructure.  Make EVERY street bike-friendly.  Not just one here and there.

Inside a hotel in the grey, concrete-dominated downtown core, Stephanie Kampmann thought Toronto seemed dark, congested and uninviting.

The first-time visitor from Germany had resigned herself to the idea that Vancouver, the next leg of her cross-Canada tour, would make up for the disappointment. Seeing the city as a cyclist, she says, gave her a new perspective.

On a bright July morning, Kampmann, her husband Axel and their two teenaged children took a pass on the sightseeing bus and zipped around the city as many locals do – by pedal power. Led by a guide from Toronto Bicycle Tours, Kampmann and her family covered significant territory in the span of a few hours, crossing well-known tourist destinations such as the CN Tower, the Rogers Centre and the Eaton Centre off their list.

Read More: Sightseeing by pedal power: Toronto touts cycle tourism options | Metro.

Related Posts:
comments powered by Disqus

EVENT: Sun, July 20 – Cycle Toronto July Social

Via CycleToronto:

Event date:

20 July, 2014 – 16:0019:00

Join us at 4:00pm on Sunday, July 20th at Propeller Roastery for a barbecue and delicious coffee roasted and brewed onsite! This is a family-friendly event and children are welcome! We’ll also be leading a group bike ride from Christie Pits at 3:15pm — details below.

Location:
Propeller Roastery

50 Wade Ave

Toronto, ON

read more

(BikingToronto has partnered with CycleToronto to bring this content from their site right to BikingToronto. View the original post here.

Related Posts:
comments powered by Disqus

HISTORY: The 19th-century health scare “bicycle face”

Lady Cyclist

Bicycle Face is real.  It’s called smiling.  Only bike commuters do it.

Once upon a time, the main danger associated with bicycling had nothing to do with being hit by a car.

Instead, some late 19th century doctors warned that — especially for women — using the newfangled contraption could lead to a threatening medical condition: bicycle face.

“Over-exertion, the upright position on the wheel, and the unconscious effort to maintain one’s balance tend to produce a wearied and exhausted ‘bicycle face,’” noted the Literary Digest in 1895.

Read More: The 19th-century health scare that told women to worry about “bicycle face” – Vox.

Related Posts:
comments powered by Disqus

INFRASTRUCTURE: Toronto council approves Eglinton Connects renewal plan

EglintonAtTheGoldenMile.img_assist_custom-525x295

Good news… Eglinton Connects (which has separated bikelanes) has been approved by Council.  The Ford schmoes again prove their idiocy by their statements about something hurting drivers (the only kind of Torontonian with rights in Ford’s Toronto).  I used to live at Eglinton and Mt. Pleasant and there was ALWAYS only one lane of moving cars in each direction for the stretch in question (Avenue to Mt. Pleasant) because of parked cars in each curblane.  Even during rush hours there would always be illegal parkers.

Very disappointed in Josh Matlow and his saying that the original plan would have hurt motorists.

Matlow moved to add right-turn lanes in both directions at key intersections between Avenue Rd. and Mt. Pleasant Rd. to avoid blocking the through lane. That change was approved 28-5.

Josh… the whole point of making a street more attractive to businesses and pedestrians and cyclists is to make the street work for PEOPLE.  Not for cars.  For PEOPLE.  People who live and work on Eglinton.  Not the people just using Eglinton as a thoroughfare.

Mayor Rob Ford and Councillor Doug Ford attempted Friday to trash the Eglinton Connects streetscape plan as a “war on the car,” despite a move to ease the impact of the remodel on motorists.

The brothers’ arguments failed to gain traction with council, which voted 26-7 for the plan.

It calls for wider sidewalks, more trees, bike lanes and other amenities, while shrinking through traffic to one lane in each direction between Mount Pleasant and Avenue Rds.

Full Article: Toronto council approves Eglinton Connects renewal plan | Metro.

Related Posts:
comments powered by Disqus

Popular Posts This Week