Learn more about BikingToronto and Singer Kwinter

Toronto’s Cycling Apps

On Friday, we let you know about the updated Toronto Bike Map, which plots out the city’s bikelanes (using info from the Open Data project) and offers directions between addresses.  Yesterday, BlogTO reviewed all 4 Toronto cycling apps, and it’s great information so we’re going to do a quick rundown of them here for you (you can find more info on the BlogTO post):

Toronto Bike Map App

Price: Free

This is the app to use if you want all of Toronto’s bikelanes (and signed bike routes, and recreational trails) plotted out on a map for you.  It also uses Google Maps Bike Directions to offer routes between addresses – which is mostly pretty accurate (it’ll recommend bikelaned streets if available), but not perfect.

Download from iTunes

 

BikeFixTO

Price: $0.99

This app does one thing and does it really well.  It maps out bikeshops for you.  It not only tells you where the closest shops are, depending on where you are, but it includes a photo of the shop and the shop hours – so you don’t have to worry about showing up and the shop being closed.

Download from iTunes

 

Ride the City App

Price: $2.99

This seems to be the most accurate directions app – as user information seems to be incorporated into the directions function.  This app also maps out bikeshops.  It does not map out bikelanes though, which, to me is a big drawback for an app called “Ride The City”.

Download from iTunes

 

Bixou Lite

Price: Free

This is the Bixi app – it only has Montreal Bixi info right now, but should be updated shortly after May 3rd, when Bixi Toronto launches.  This app will show us where the closest Bixi Toronto bike docking stations are, and if there are either a) available bikes (if we are looking at picking one up) or b) available spots (if we are looking at dropping one off)

Download from iTunes

 

comments powered by Disqus

Toronto Mobile Bike Map App Updated

The Toronto Bike Map App (available on iTunes for free) has been updated.

The creator, Mike Lin, has made what I think is the best online bike map (it uses the City’s Open Data information) even better by adding directions.

You can punch in start and end points, and the app tells you the best way to get there. The app integrates with Bike Directions on Google Maps to accomplish this.

Give it a try (it’s free!) and let us know what you think.

Some screenshots of the App:


comments powered by Disqus

New Toronto Bikeway Network Map

PLEASE NOTE: this map was done as part of a graphic design exercise and does not claim to be complete or accurate.

There’s a cool new map of all of our downtown bikelanes, coined the “BWN” after BikeWay Network.

You can really tell that the “network” needs a lot more… and the Jarvis bikelane isn’t on there.

Click the map for the full-size version (which still isn’t that big)

comments powered by Disqus

2010 Bikeway Network Projects – Mapped

There is an excellent information resource in the latest issue of Cyclometer – a Google Map that shows all the Bikeway Projects started or completed in 2010, as well as photos on their facebook group of the projects:


View 2010 Bikeway Network Projects in a larger map

Project photos include:

Harbord-Hoskin Bikeway: Dashed lines and chevrons have been used to help make the bike lane more continuous.

The reconstruction of Moore Avenue and installation of bike lanes from Bayview Avenue to Hudson Street was completed.

In Parkdale, the Dufferin Street Tunnel has been completed. The tunnel has been built at a width to include bike lanes, and it’s lighting has been designed with the needs of cyclists and pedestrians in mind.

Bike boxes have been added at the Spadina Avenue, St. George Street and Queen's Park Crescent intersections, along the Harbord Street – Hoskin Avenue corridor.

comments powered by Disqus

Help the City of Toronto plan the 2011 Bike Map

The City of Toronto has posted a survey online to get your feedback about the Toronto Cycling Map:

The City of Toronto is conducting this survey to learn about how people are using the Map, what works, and what could be improved.

Every year the City publishes and distributes 150,000 Cycling Maps free of charge.

Go by the site and leave your feedback.

Unfortunately it doesn’t ask for features that people would like added to the map, but only how often existing features are used currently.  Having said that, the map is extremely useful.  I always have one in the bottom of my panniers (yes, one in each) so that I can consult it if need be.

comments powered by Disqus






Popular Posts This Week