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INFRASTRUCTURE: Improvements sought for 6 Lakeshore Blvd intersections

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Ward 13 Bikes is putting on a push to improve the pedestrian and cyclist connections at Lakeshore Blvd near High Park.   It’s a travesty that our city’s largest park is separated from the waterfront by Lakeshore Blvd with no safe way to cross it (yet).

We have a proposal submitted to City Hall, and to Councillor Doucette to improve safety for both pedestrians and cyclist at the six intersections between Windemere, Ellis and Colborne Lodge with both the Queensway and Lakeshore Drive. The need for improvements has been there for years, but it is particularly acute now with the opening of the new Sunnyside Bike Park just this past week.

Read much more: Ward 13 Bikes — Intersection improvements in the ward.

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INFRASTRUCTURE: The Adelaide bikelane painted buffer is going in

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Woohoo!  Look at the quick progress on Adelaide.  If only all bikelanes went in this fast.  Why don’t all bikelanes go in this fast?

Painted buffer has been installed on Adelaide, between Bathurst and Brant. Please use caution when cycling in this construction area.

via City of Toronto Cycling.

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INFRASTRUCTURE: What are the rules of the bike lane in Toronto?

I posted about this back in June, but maybe I should schedule this as a monthly post to remind everyone, frequently.  I went looking for it again after getting some cranky comments defending the postal worker who blocked the St. George bikelane and then swore at a cyclist for documenting it.

The rules of the Toronto bike lane are, let’s face it, unclear. Judging from a recent helmet cam video circulated on YouTube, most cyclists don’t know which vehicles are legally allowed to be stopped or parked in the bike lane. Contrary to popular belief, even dedicated bike lanes aren’t off-limits to all motorized vehicles.

The lack of clearly posted rules is coupled with a dearth of visible enforcement–fines range from $60 to $150 for most bike lane infractions, but the biggest scofflaws–delivery van drivers and moving companies, judging from angry tweets–seem able to dodge enforcement officers with relative ease, increasing the sense of frustration from cyclists.

Coming straight from the City of Toronto bylaw, here are the rules of the Toronto bike lane. Note that the rules differ slightly for painted and separated bike lanes, like on Sherbourne and Wellesley.

Read the rules: What exactly are the rules of the bike lane in Toronto?.

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INFRASTUCTURE: Adelaide Separated Lane gets “pre-marked” tonight

Adelaide is almost ready for the big show!  Bring on the paint and the flexi-bollards!  It’s happening on Richmond too!

@TO_Transport has repaved curb lane for Adelaide Cycle Track Pilot Project pre-marking starts tonight

via Twitter / TO_Cycling: @TO_Transport has repaved curb ….

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INFRASTRUCTURE: Richmond and Adelaide being prepped for new bikelanes

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Richmond and Adelaide are coming!  I’m gonna make some special trips down there to be able to ride them.

Curb lanes on Richmond and Adelaide have been ground down, in preparation for new asphalt we are putting down for the Cycle Tracks.

via City of Toronto Cycling Facebook Page.

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