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ELSEWHERE: Checking out Ottawa Bike Infrastructure, Part 3

Here’s the 3rd and final installment in the Ottawa Bike Video Postcards series.  This time it’s from the Alexandra Bridge over the Ottawa River.

I walked out there as Ottawa almost totally shuts down after 5pm (all government workers, I guess)… even the one downtown bike rental place.  So, although I wanted to do some biking in the evenings after I was done my conference stuff, there wasn’t a way.

Previous Videos from Ottawa:

 


 

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ELSEWHERE: Checking out Ottawa Bike Infrastructure, Part 2

Hey everyone, back with another quick video postcard about Ottawa bike infrastructure.  This one is about separated bikelanes on Laurier Ave that run the length of downtown Ottawa.  They are made simply and cheaply, but very effectively.

If you missed yesterday’s video post, it was about dedicated lanes for bikes and transit on the Mackenzie King Bridge over the Rideau Canal.

 

 

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ELSEWHERE: Checking out Ottawa Bike Infrastructure

I’m in Ottawa for a few days for a conference and have started making small video postcards of the bike infrastructure I’m seeing.  Here’s the first one from the Mackenzie King Bridge over the Rideau Canal.

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ELSEWHERE: North America’s Best Kept (Cycling) Secret

To give credit where it’s due, when it comes to bicycle infrastructure, the City of Montréal has consistently remained 30 years ahead of the curve. While the rest of North America was busy wasting its time (and countless lives) with sharrows, door-zone paint, and Forester-inspired notions of vehicular cycling, Montréal wisely imitated the European cities who had long figured out how to mainstream the act of utility cycling: full modal separation.

via North America’s Best Kept (Cycling) Secret | Spacing National.

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ELSEWHERE: Montreal shifts gears to keep up with rising popularity of cycling

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Nothing unusual in Montreal to see hipsters, couriers and two-wheeled commuters of all ages sharing the roads. Here, they laugh dismissively when Toronto Mayor Rob Ford’s pro-car administration comes up in conversation.

But the rate at which Montrealers are hopping on their bikes to get around the city has created a whole new problem in a place haunted by infrastructure projects that never seem to end or, when they do, are stained by the dirty legacy of corruption.

“The challenge is that we have asked people to start using their bicycles and they’ve done it so much faster than we’ve been able to change the city,” said Aref Salem, who is responsible for municipal transportation on the city’s executive committee.

Read More: Montreal shifts gears to keep up with rising popularity of cycling | Toronto Star

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