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INFRASTRUCTURE: Solving the bike problem with the new generation of bike storage

Great examples of what can be done, and is being done in other cities.

The momentum for ‘mode-shift’ to cycling in our cities continues at a pace, giving cyclists a new problem: where do they safely park their bicycles? Every day bikes are exposed to the rigours of the weather and threat of theft, making city dwellers particularly aware of the importance of secure parking. Some (but not many) commuters are blessed with the provision of vast underground parking areas below their offices, but what do the rest do? Bicycles are filling the streets, and the huge volume of street parking spaces are making some areas look increasingly unattractive and cluttered; visit the main railway station in Copenhagen and you will see how cycling can become a victim of its own success.

Full article: Solving the bike problem with the new generation of bike storage | Knowledge.

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ELSEWHERE: Scared of Biking in Traffic? These Cities Are Making It Safe

It’s a shame I have to put this in the “Elsewhere” category.  Until Toronto gets off it’s butt and joins the 21st century, that’s where it will stay.

“Over the past five years we’re seeing an infrastructure revolution, a rethinking of our streets to accommodate more users [through] busways, public plazas, space for pedestrians, and, of course, bike lanes,” says David Vega-Barachowitz of the National Association of City Transportation Officials. “More protected bike lanes is one of the most important parts of this.”

Protected bike lanes separate people on bikes from rushing traffic with concrete curbs, plastic bollards or other means—and sometimes offer additional safety measures such as special traffic lights and painted crossings at intersections.

Full Article: Scared of Biking in Traffic? These Cities Are Making It Safe by Jay Walljasper — YES! Magazine.

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ELSEWHERE: Bike Plans in Other Cities: Amsterdam, Calgary and Chicago

In homage to our BRAND NEW bike plan election issue of dandyhorse we decided to write about other cities’ bike plans to explore new ideas that could work for Toronto’s soon-to-be refurbished bike plan.

This is the third in our series “Bike Plans in Other Cities.”

Read More: Bike Plans in Other Cities: Amsterdam, Calgary and Chicago | dandyhorse magazine.

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ELSEWHERE: The Atlanta BeltLine – Catalyst infrastructure and city systems

From Spacing, a great example of what can be done with abandoned rail lands:

Through advocacy, local organizing and support from civic leaders, Gravel’s thesis project transformed into the Atlanta BeltLine, a $3 billion public works project that is one of the most comprehensive urban redevelopment projects in North America today. The Atlanta BeltLine will integrate this abandoned 22-mile railroad corridor into a network of transit, pedestrian and cycling routes, as well as public parks, integrating affordable housing, public art and historic preservation and connecting 40 diverse neighbourhoods in downtown Atlanta. In this way, the BeltLine is very much a comprehensive urban development project — considering transit, housing, connectivity, and economic development as interconnected parts of a whole, to shape the kind of city that Atlanta wants to be.

Read More: The Atlanta BeltLine: Catalyst infrastructure and city systems | Spacing Toronto.

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ELSEWHERE: P’tit Vélib’ — bike-sharing program for kids launches in Paris

Bike-sharing programs have been all the rage in recent years. The Vélib’ program in Paris was by many accounts the program that got the massive trend rolling. Now, it has started P’tit Vélib’, a bike-sharing program for the kiddies.

To start things off, the bikes will be available in 5 locations around the city. More will roll out by the end of summer. Various kid-bike sizes will be available, including bikes with training wheels.

Read More: P’tit Vélib’ — bike-sharing program for kids launches in Paris : TreeHugger.

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