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Urban Bicycling Is For Lazy People

 

This is fantastic. Do yourself a favour and read how urban cyclists are lazy over at the Urban Country.

Here in Canada, as in the United States, people tend to generally view bicycles primarily for recreation or sport. Thus, when someone asks me how I arrived somewhere and I tell them I rode my bicycle, they naturally assume that I am athletic, brave, unusual, always late, and I probably need to take a shower.

In reality however, I arrive on time, I’m not sweaty, and I rode my bike not for a workout, but rather au contraire, I rode my bicycle because I am lazy.

read full article: The Urban Country

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Ontario Gov’t likes, but stalls on 1 metre rule

Toronto cycling activists were disappointed Tuesday when the city’s executive committee decided to wait for the province before weighing in on a new rule that would require motorists to leave a metre of space between their car and a bike when passing.

A day later, there was better news but no commitment from Ontario Transportation Minister Glen Murray.

While he believes in the 1-metre passing rule, already in effect in many U.S. states and Nova Scotia, Murray said Wednesday he couldn’t commit to it.

full story: Metro

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Cyclists advocate new Greenbelt bike route

Ajax Mayor Steve Parish has explored the world in destinations as far-flung as New Zealand — on his bike.

He’s convinced the Toronto region could be one of the world’s great destinations in the growing cycling tourism industry.

Parish was part of a team at the Ontario Bike SummitTuesday touting a new 600-kilometre Ontario Greenbelt cycling route being developed by the Waterfront Regeneration Trust and Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation.

“This is a great region but the reality is the world doesn’t know we’re a great region. We’re in danger of falling drastically and irrevocably behind our competitors,” said Parish.

read full story: Toronto Star

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Ontario Bike Summit: Changing the Conversation

Eleanor McMahon thinks it’s time to change the conversation around cycling in Ontario.

McMahon is the founder of the Share the Road Cycling Coalition, who will be hosting the fifth annual Ontario Bike Summit this week in Toronto. She says that we need to stop talking about things like bike lanes and other bicycle infrastructure as a zero sum game between cars and bikes.

“We do polling, and our polling tells us that 89 per cent of Ontarians are both drivers and cyclists,” she says. “The notion that it’s cars versus bikes is overblown, and it’s really not working anymore. Deciding to change the conversation means going out of our way to poke holes in that idea and say from the get go ‘We don’t buy into that philosophy, and just because you say it, doesn’t make it true.’ ”

 read full story: Torontoist

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Women Lead the Way For Cycling

According to “The American Bicyclist Study: On the Road to 2020,” released in 2012 and conducted by the Gluskin Townley Group, the women of Generation Y represent an important change to who is buying and riding bicycles. To us, this is a clear indication that it’s high time for the bicycle industry to embrace the next generation of bicycle riders, a group that will represent 100 million adults in the next seven years.

The bicycle industry needs to adapt as the market shifts towards a new bicycle consumer: women who use the bicycle as a tool. A tool that serves many purposes and is used for transportation, for exercise, for spending quality time with their children, for stress relief, and, most importantly, for fun.

read full article: Momentum Mag.

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