How To Use TTC Bus BikeRacks

Want to bike to work but think it’s a little too far to go?

The good news is that many many TTC buses now have bikeracks on the front (within a few years, 100% of TTC buses will have bikeracks on them!).  They are very easy to use (yet very secure) and allow you to extend your bike-commuting “range” a ton!

Pop your bike on a bus bikerack and get a ride to closer to your job – where you can then pop your bike off and ride the rest of the way. :)

Here’s a how-to video for you! :)

9 thoughts on “How To Use TTC Bus BikeRacks”

  1. For a long time I avoided trying these because I was worried they’d be difficult to use and folks would get grumpy at me for holding them up. The fact is they’re as easy as they look.

    It should be noted that there are very similar racks on all GO buses now as well which can really extend your range. I used them a few months back to visit a client in the suburbs of Buffalo. I took a Coach Canada bus there (folding bike in the cargo hold). Once I got to Niagara Falls, I rode across the border and right on to an off-road bikeway that took me to Grand Island. On the way back I just rode back across, tossed the bike on the front of a GO bus and then carried it (plus my laptop and week’s worth of laundry) onto a GO train home.

    The other use that for some reason never occured to me before was for inclement weather. Often I flake out on a commute in the morning because there’s a *chance* there will be afternoon showers even if the morning is beautiful. Yesterday I rode in to work and then the cold drizzle came in to town. So I put the bike on the bus for most of the way home. I suspect that TTC buses could end up being my “tow truck” in the future as well if need be…

  2. I wonder if there are any additional mechanizms holding the TTC rack on its original place or you just pull it down? And would it be suitable for any bike? Thank you!

  3. Mike – the handle you use to pull it down has a simple latch – just gently squeeze the handle and it releases. When you fold it back in it automatically latches to the front of the bus again.

    I’d say it is suitable for most upright full-sized bikes. Most recumbent ones probably wouldn’t work. I’m guessing probably anything with 20″ wheels or better would work, though.

  4. Good points, Todd. I got stuck in the rain with a flat on Keele near York University the first time I tried one of the bike racks.

    Loading and unloading was pretty quick. The bar that rests on your front tire is actually pretty secure, although I spent a good 30 mins staring at my bike while the bus aimed for every bump along the way. It didn’t bounce off.

    Recumbents probably won’t fit, and if your bike has really fat tires they may not fit either.

  5. I haven’t used these yet – I’ve intended to a couple of times, but the drivers have always just motioned me to bring the bike inside, since it was at off-peak hours and I guess they figured it would be quicker that way.

    They do look pretty easy to use, judging by the video… My only concern is, if it’s that easy to take the bike off, and you’re not allowed to lock it onto the rack, wouldn’t it be pretty easy for someone to steal the bike while the bus was stopped at a red light or something?

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